Forum Eerste Wereldoorlog Forum Index Forum Eerste Wereldoorlog
Hét WO1-forum voor Nederland en Vlaanderen
 
 FAQFAQ   ZoekenZoeken   GebruikerslijstGebruikerslijst   WikiWiki   RegistreerRegistreer 
 ProfielProfiel   Log in om je privé berichten te bekijkenLog in om je privé berichten te bekijken   InloggenInloggen   Actieve TopicsActieve Topics 

30 juni

 
Plaats nieuw bericht   Plaats Reactie    Forum Eerste Wereldoorlog Forum Index -> Wat gebeurde er vandaag... Actieve Topics
Vorige onderwerp :: Volgende onderwerp  
Auteur Bericht
Hauptmann



Geregistreerd op: 17-2-2005
Berichten: 11547

BerichtGeplaatst: 30 Jun 2006 6:03    Onderwerp: 30 juni Reageer met quote

June 30

1914 European powers maintain focus despite killings in Sarajevo

In an editorial published on the final day of June 1914, two days after the killing of Archduke Franz Ferdinand of Austria-Hungary and his wife by a Serbian nationalist during an official appearance in Sarajevo, Bosnia, the London Times urges a continued focus on domestic affairs.

Although what happened in Sarajevo obviously filled “the first place in the public mind,” acknowledged the Times, and the outcome of the investigation into the killing would no doubt “occupy the attention of all students of European politics,” it was imperative that Britons keep their priorities straight, because “our own affairs must be addressed.” At the time, the United Kingdom was threatened by the possible outbreak of civil war over the future status of Ireland—this presumably was the principal “affair” to which the Times was referring.

In Britain, as in many of the European capitals, the assassination of Franz Ferdinand was at first viewed in a less alarmist light than might be assumed given the enormity of the war that the event would later precipitate. The archduke had not been widely liked, within his own country or without, and as the British ambassador to Italy reported to his government in London: “It is obvious that people have generally regarded the elimination of the Archduke as almost providential.” In Paris on June 30, at the first cabinet meeting since the events in Sarajevo, President Raymond Poincare’s biographer reported later that the killings were “hardly mentioned.” The attention of the French public, meanwhile, was riveted on the scandalous case of Madame Caillaux, a politician’s wife who had murdered the editor of a right-wing newspaper after he threatened to publish damaging material about her husband.

Even in Vienna, the archduke’s own capital city, Franz Ferdinand’s death seemed to arouse little strong feeling from the public. As the Austrian government and military leadership hurried to obtain assurances of German support if the Austrian pressure on Serbia over the assassinations led to war with Serbia and its powerful ally, Russia, the reaction among the Austrian population was mild, almost indifferent. As historian Z.A.B. Zeman later wrote, “the event almost failed to make any impression whatsoever. On Sunday and Monday [June 28 and 29], the crowds in Vienna listened to music and drank wine…as if nothing had happened.”

http://www.historychannel.com
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
Percy Toplis



Geregistreerd op: 9-5-2009
Berichten: 13581
Woonplaats: Suindrecht

BerichtGeplaatst: 30 Jun 2010 1:09    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

The Boar’s Head - Richebourg 30th June 1916

The Boar’s Head is not a battle honour you’ll find in any history of the Great War. It was an obscure salient in the German lines around the tiny village of Richebourg l’Avoue in northern France. Formed after the Battle of Aubers Ridge in May 1915, the trenches here were once part of the German support line and following meagre success new front line positions were established which would remain the same until April 1918, when the German offensive broke. The Boar’s Head was so named because the westward pointing salient it created looked like the head of a boar. For units occupying the line here, this salient had given the Germans the upper hand and had enabled them to lay enfilade fire on forward trenches, patrols in No Man’s Land and wiring parties. It had been a thorn in the side of the British army for some time, and local commanders had long wished to be rid of it. That opportunity finally came in June 1916.

Plans for the Battle of the Somme dated back to late 1915, and as the Anglo-French offensive approached in the early summer of 1916 it had become much more of a British affair, given the drastic situation at Verdun. Disguising the huge build-up on the Somme had proved problematic, and in an attempt to confuse the Germans as to the true location of the attack, a number of diversionary operations were planned. The best known is the assault at Gommecourt, but it is largely forgotten that others took place as well. The 1st Division attacked the Double Crassier at Loos on 30th June (well recounted in Giles Eyre’s Somme Harvest) and in Flanders the 41st Division carried out some local operations at Ploegsteert. In northern France the 39th Division was allocated to a similar action at the Boar’s Head.

The 39th Division was a Kitchener’s Army formation, which had been formed in mid-1915 and trained at Witley Camp, near Guildford. It’s three brigades, 116th, 117th and 118th, consisted of a mixed bag of different regiments, but in the senior brigade (116th) there were three ‘pals’ battalions: 11th, 12th and 13th Royal Sussex Regiment. They were otherwise known as the 1st, 2nd and 3rd South Downs battalions, and locally in Sussex as Lowther’s Lambs after Lt-Col Claude Lowther MP, who had raised them in 1914. Recruited from all over Sussex, there were specific companies drawn from Sussex towns - such as Bexhill, Eastbourne and Hastings – and as such represented a good cross section of the community from this part of the county. They had crossed to France in March 1916 with the rest of the division, and had served in the Fleurbaix and Festubert sectors before taking over the trenches at Richebourg. It was while in the line at Festubert that war poet Edmund Blunden (author of Undertones of War) joined them in May 1916.

The plan for the diversionary attack at the Boar’s Head was to launch a two-battalion attack, with a third in reserve. The leading units would ‘bite off’ the salient, and enter the German lines as far as the support trenches. Here they would establish a new front line, possibly draw in some German reserves that might otherwise be sent to the Somme and generally confuse the enemy. The plan was developed at Corps headquarters, and the 39th Division was chosen to carry it out. Major General R.Dawson, commanding the 39th, decided his senior brigade would be used, and the South Downs were selected given the good reputation and cohesion as a unit. The 11th would lead, with the 12th on its right, and the 13th in reserve. Plans were passed down to battalion level.

Lieutenant Colonel Harman Grisewood, commanding the 11th (1st South Downs) received them with mixed emotions. Grisewood, from Bognor, had joined the 11th with his two brothers in 1914. Harman had risen to command a company, then the battalion. One brother became the Adjutant, and another was a platoon commander. The adjutant had died of illness at Merville in late March 1916, and veterans of the 11th noted how the Colonel became a changed man after this (1). He looked at the plans for the assault and was concerned that an assault over largely unfamiliar ground with untried troops might result in a disaster. One veteran, Bob Short, told the author that Harman Grisewood had instructed his brigade commander,

" I am not sacrificing my men as cannon-fodder!" (2)

The attack had to go in regardless, and Major General R.Dawson lost faith in the ability of the 11th Battalion to carry it out, particularly if their commanding officer had no stomach for the fight. He therefore dismissed Grisewood, relegated the 11th to the support role and replaced them with the 13th. Grisewood left his men on the eve of the battle, never to return. After a period in England, he was posted to the 17th Manchesters in 1917 and commanded them in the field until severely gassed.

Meanwhile preparations for the ‘raid’, as it was known officially, were well in hand. The divisional artillery began the usual preparatory bombardment several days in advance, and behind the lines the troops practised the operation at the divisional training ground. ‘Z’ Day for the Somme was changed to 1st July because of poor weather, so the date for the attack on the Boar’s Head was likewise modified to 30th June. However, this information did not arrive until the last minute, after the South Downs had left the training area and were already on their way to the front line at Richebourg. The delay did not give them any further chance to practice, but simply meant they would now hang around in the forward area until Zero Hour on the 30th.

The first sense of alarm came following the 12th and 13th battalions arrival opposite the Boar’s Head. Observing through trench periscopes, officers of the battalions noticed the Germans had erected signboards on their parapets which read ‘When are you coming over Tommy?’. The bombardment had acted as a calling card, and it was clear the enemy was expecting them. Final preparations continued regardless, and from interviews with survivors it seems few were aware of this fateful bit of intelligence.

At 3.05am on 30th June 1916 the attack began. The 12th advanced on the right, with the junction of the 12th/13th being the tip of the Boar’s Head, where an old communication trench ran from the British parapet across to the German front line. Going forward in the half darkness, the smoke bombardment intended to screen their advance drifted across the leading waves causing some confusion. Private Harry Finch, an Eastbourne man, was among the attackers. He recalled the events of the last few hours.

" We paraded at ten o'clock on the Thursday night for the trenches in full fighting order ready to go over the top the next morning. We all said the Lord's Prayer with our chaplain who addressed a few words to us and gave us the blessing. All night we were hard at work cutting the barbed wire in front and carrying out bridges to put over a big ditch in front of our parapet. The time we were to go over the guns started a terrible bombardment of the enemy's trenches. As soon as they started the enemy sent up a string of red lights as a signal to his own guns. I got a fragment of shell on the elbow about five minutes before our men went over... They blew our trenches right in at places." (3)

Not long after the British bombardment had ceased, the Germans had emerged from their dugouts and machine-gun fire had started to rake No Man’s Land. Officers in the leading companies were already beginning to fall and it was left to Warrant Officers and NCOs to take over.

One of these was CSM Nelson Victor Carter. From Hailsham, Carter had served as an old soldier before the war and settled in Eastbourne where he had worked as a cinema commissionaire at the first ‘picture show’ in Old Town. He joined the 11th battalion in September 1914, and was transferred as CSM of A Company in the 12th when that was raised in October. Armed only with a revolver, Carter led his men forward and took over when his company commander fell riddled with bullets. When they reached the German lines, the wire was in places uncut, but they managed to affect an entry in a few places. Carter led his men in, and succeeded in reaching the support line. Here he expected to find the 13th Battalion, but there was no sign of them. After a couple of hours, German counter-attacks forced them back and the whole position was abandoned with heavy losses. CSM Carter then assisted in the evacuation of the wounded from No Man’s Land until he went out on one last occasion and was shot by a sniper. Captain H.T.K.Robinson had witness the whole event, along with numerous others. He later recalled,

" I next saw him about an hour later. I had been wounded in the meanwhile and was lying in our trench... [Carter] repeatedly went over the parapet - I saw him going over alone - and carried in our wounded men from No Man's Land. He brought them in on his back, and he could not have done this had he not possessed exceptional physical strength as well as courage." (4)

Carter was recommended for a posthumous Victoria Cross, which was gazetted in September. The citation reads:

Citation from the London Gazette No 29740, September 9, 1916:

"Nelson Victor Carter, Company Sergeant Major 4th Company, 12th Battalion, Royal Sussex Regiment. Date of act of bravery; 30th June, 1916, for most conspicuous bravery. During an attack he was in command of the fourth wave of the assault. Under intense shell and machine-gun fire he penetrated, with a few men, into the enemy's second line and inflicted heavy casualties with bombs. When forced to retire to the enemy's first line, he captured a machine-gun and shot the gunner with his revolver. Finally, after carrying several wounded men into safety, he was himself mortally wounded, and died in a few minutes. His conduct throughout the day was magnificent."

Buried close to the front line in a field grave with some of his comrades, Carter was moved to Royal Irish Rifles Graveyard near Laventie in the 1920s. His daughter Jessie, who was only three when her father died, often used to wear the VC at the annual Aubers Ridge parade in Eastbourne. She spent her whole life in the town, until her death in 2000. The VC still remains with the family, who often visit the grave at Laventie.

On the 13th Battalion front the situation was even worse. The smoke bombardment there had drifted into the attackers, and the men had totally lost their direction. Some ended up advancing at an angle across No Man’s Land, exposing their vulnerable flanks to the Germans. Many were mown down in waves. A ditch existed in front of the British trenches, and carrying parties with small bridges had gone forward to assist in the crossing of it. These had been amongst the first to fall, and very few of the bridges were in place. Most had to scramble in and out of the ditch, as machine-gun fire swept up and down. On reaching the German front line, most of the wire was intact, and very few of the 13th ever made it into the German trenches. By the close of operations a handful of survivors made their way back to the British front line.

The 11th had been in reserve for the battle, and had not been committed as a complete unit. However, D Company had gone in as a carrying party commanded by Captain Eric Cassells. It was almost entirely wiped out, with Cassells wounded and all his other officers becoming casualties; among them Harman Grisewood’s younger brother, Francis, who was killed leading his platoon in (5).

As the remnants of the three South Downs battalions came out of the line the full scale of the losses slowly became apparent. As roll calls were made, it emerged that the total casualties for the morning's fighting were 15 officers and 364 Other Ranks killed or died of wounds, and 21 officers and 728 Other Ranks wounded; nearly 1,100 South Downers.

These figures belie the full human tragedy of Richebourg. In 1919, His Majesty's Stationary Office published Soldiers Died in the Great War 1914-19, Volume 40 of which covers the Royal Sussex Regiment. This source shows, among other information, where each casualty was born and enlisted. Using this data, an analysis of the effect of the casualties at Richebourg on the county of Sussex can be made. Of the 349 other ranks killed in action on June 30th 1916, Soldiers Died shows that 243 were born in Sussex; some 70%. The majority of the others would have certainly been residents of Sussex, but this source does not show place of residence if born outside the county. For example men like Regimental Sergeant Major May's son, Lance Sergeant George Edward May. He had been born in Kis, India, while May senior had been serving there in 1896. On the outbreak of the war, the May family resided at Linden Avenue, Bognor.

Again, using the information in Soldiers Died, it is possible to ascertain that seventy-seven towns, villages and parishes were affected by the fatalities of those shown as born in Sussex; the greatest number coming from Brighton and Eastbourne. The latter is not surprising, considering there were several companies of Eastbourne men in the 12th Battalion. The additional fatalities, men not shown as having been born in Sussex but residing there like the May family, may have brought this figure up to nearer a hundred communities affected by the dead alone. With over 700 wounded, there can have been few places in Sussex that were unaffected by the losses at Richebourg.

Among the dead were dozens of tragic stories. Corporal Percy Parsons of the 13th Battalion who had dodged a sick parade to ensure his part in the attack had died on the German wire (6). Lance Corporal Frederick Chandler of the 12th Battalion had written to his parents in Eastbourne claiming he would "... ‘get one in for Fritz' " to avenge his brother Stewart who had died at sea in 1915. Chandler was killed in the early stages of the attack (7). Private Harry Mercer had enlisted in the 11th Battalion at Hastings aged only sixteen; he died after a year and a half in uniform (8). Private James Honeyset of the 13th Battalion was killed at Richebourg aged 36, a veteran of the Boer War. His brother was killed alongside him (9).

Elsewhere, five other pairs of brothers lay dead on the battlefield. The Blaker family of Worthing, the Blurton family, the Bottings of Balcombe, the Bristow family of Wiston, the Sumners of Crawley; all had double bereavements. The Jackson family from Amberley joined them when on 3rd July both their sons died of wounds within hours of each other. Worst of all was the Pannell family from Worthing. They had three sons in the 12th Battalion and one in the 13th; William and Charles died with the 12th, Alfred with the 13th - having only enlisted in late 1915 to join his brothers - and the fourth son was taken prisoner. After the war, none of their graves could be found and their names were listed together on the Loos Memorial to the Missing; a sad testimony to one family's supreme sacrifice.

Many veterans of Richebourg spoke of this attack as the ‘butcher’s shop’. One, Albert Banfield, used to write to the author every 30th June, on the anniversary of the battle. In one letter he remarked,

"… truly, this was the day Sussex died." (10)

NOTES
(1) Captain G.M.J.A.Grisewood. Died of illness 27th March 1916. Buried Merville British Cemetery.
(2) Interview with author.
(3) Eastbourne Gazette 19th July 1916.
(4) Eastbourne Gazette 27th September 1916.
(5) 2/Lt Francis Grisewood, 11th Bn Royal Sussex. KIA 30th June 1916. Commemorated Loos Memorial.
(6) Cpl Percy Parsons. 13th Royal Sussex. KIA 30th June 1916. Buried Cabaret Rouge British Cemetery, Souchez.
(7) L/Cpl Frederick Chandler. 12th Royal Sussex. KIA 30th June 1916. Buried St Vaast Post Military Cemetery.
(8) Pte Harry Mercer. 11th Royal Sussex. KIA 30th June 1916. Buried St Vaast Post Military Cemetery.
(9) Pte James G. Honeyset 13th Royal Sussex. KIA 30th June 1916. Buried St Vaast Post Military Cemetery. His brother Cecil is commemorated on the Loos Memorial.
(10) From correspondence with author 1986.

©Paul Reed 2001-2007


http://battlefields1418.50megs.com/boars_head.htm
_________________

"Omdat ik alles beter weet is het mijn plicht om betweters te minachten."
Marcel Wauters, Vlaams schrijver en kunstenaar 1921-2005
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
Percy Toplis



Geregistreerd op: 9-5-2009
Berichten: 13581
Woonplaats: Suindrecht

BerichtGeplaatst: 30 Jun 2010 17:43    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

JUNE 30TH, 1915: O'Donovan Rossa's death famous for oratory at grave

THE DEATH of Fenian leader Jeremiah O’Donovan Rossa in New York in 1915 struck The Irish Times of the day, preoccupied with the first World War, as an interesting item from history. O’Donovan Rossa had been effectively exiled for some 45 years – he was 83 when he died – but remained active in Fenian politics: his main claim to fame subsequently came from the stirring oration by Pádraig Pearse at his graveside in Glasnevin Cemetery a month after his death.

The death of O’Donovan Rossa in New York is announced this morning. There was a time in Ireland when his death would have created a sensation, but it is no exaggeration to say that today there are many who had almost forgotten his existence, and if they thought of the part he played in the Fenian movement of the Fifties and the early Sixties of last century, it was in a spirit of mere passing curiosity. To go back in imagination from the present world war to the futile schemes of Rossa and his fellow workers is like passing suddenly from tragic actuality into the realm of make-believe. The danger that then loomed so large is seen today in something like its due proportion. Men faced by the armed millions of the German warlord have attained a larger and a nobler view of patriotism. The Ireland aimed at by O’Donovan Rossa and by some of those who struggled with him falls into the category of

“Old, unhappy, far off things,

And battles long ago.”

The brighter and nobler Ireland is the Ireland, one with England in the cause of truth, which may have tinged the imagery of the old Fenian’s closing dream.

O’Donovan Rossa must have passed the period of something like four score years. He was over 30 years of age in 1865, the time of the first Fenian arrests in Dublin. His connection with the Fenian movement appears to date from 1858, when Stephens undertook to develop The Phoenix National Literary Society – an association then established in Skibbereen – into a branch of the secret society he was promoting. Rossa is described as being then a young man of the peasant class, tall – he was 6ft 3in in height – pale faced, with wonderfully keen and piercing eyes, kindly by nature and with the courage of a lion, but withal inclined to pose upon occasion. Stephens found in him a ready coadjutor. Among the incidents which marked his progress was his theatrical appearance at the Dublin meeting, presided over by The O’Donoghue, to discuss a site for an Albert Memorial. Rossa and his companions wrecked the furniture of the Rotunda, and broke up the meeting.

It was in September 1865 that the Irish People was seized, O’Donovan Rossa, Thomas Clarke Luby, John O’Leary, Pierce Nagle (who turned “informer”) and several others were arrested. Rossa was tried and sentenced to imprisonment for life upon a charge of treason. His conduct throughout the trial was and his speech at the close was scathing; there was something in bearing that looked like studied pose. In 1871 he was released. He went to the United States, where, with the exception of a short visit to Cork, the remainder of his life was spent.

http://www.irishtimes.com/newspaper/opinion/2009/0630/1224249784495.html
_________________

"Omdat ik alles beter weet is het mijn plicht om betweters te minachten."
Marcel Wauters, Vlaams schrijver en kunstenaar 1921-2005
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
Percy Toplis



Geregistreerd op: 9-5-2009
Berichten: 13581
Woonplaats: Suindrecht

BerichtGeplaatst: 30 Jun 2010 17:48    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Australia and the Gallipoli Campaign

30 June 1915 - Sergeant Lawrence's diary:

I feel pretty sick and weak today — have had dysentery and neuralgia since I landed here.

http://www.anzacsite.gov.au/5environment/timelines/australia-gallipoli-campaign/june-1915.html
_________________

"Omdat ik alles beter weet is het mijn plicht om betweters te minachten."
Marcel Wauters, Vlaams schrijver en kunstenaar 1921-2005
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
Percy Toplis



Geregistreerd op: 9-5-2009
Berichten: 13581
Woonplaats: Suindrecht

BerichtGeplaatst: 30 Jun 2010 17:50    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

First battle of the Isonzo, 23 June-7 July 1915

(...) The main infantry attack was made on 30 June, on a 21 mile front. Little progress was made, although a small foothold was made on the eastern bank of the Isonzo. (...)

Rickard, J (31 August 2007), First battle of the Isonzo, 23 June-7 July 1915 , http://www.historyofwar.org/articles/battles_isonzo1.html
_________________

"Omdat ik alles beter weet is het mijn plicht om betweters te minachten."
Marcel Wauters, Vlaams schrijver en kunstenaar 1921-2005
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
Percy Toplis



Geregistreerd op: 9-5-2009
Berichten: 13581
Woonplaats: Suindrecht

BerichtGeplaatst: 30 Jun 2010 17:55    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

30 June 1915, Commons Sitting

"PEACE COMMITTEE."


HC Deb 30 June 1915 vol 72 cc1796-7 1796

Mr. R. McNEILL asked the Secretary of State for the Home Department if his attention has been directed to a group of persons calling themselves a "peace committee," of which J. S. Duckers, C. H. Norman, and Ethel Bellis hold themselves out as chairman, treasurer, and secretary, respectively, with an address at 66, Charing Cross Road; whether he is aware that these persons are engaged in distributing pamphlets of a character harmful to the national interest in relation to the War; if he can say whether any uninterned alien enemies or persons of hostile origin or association are in co-operation with this group; whether he will take steps to ascertain the source from which they obtain such financial support as they possess; and whether, having regard to the fact that their propaganda, although without influence, is offensive to the patriotism of the public, he proposes to take any measures to provide against the danger of the persons named being lynched or assaulted in an outburst of popular indignation?

The SECRETARY of STATE for the HOME DEPARTMENT (Sir John Simon) The Attorney-General has already stated, in reply to questions, that the activities 1797 of the group of persons referred to are under his consideration. As regards the last part of this question, such violence as the hon. Member contemplates would call for the severest repression, and a great responsibility would attach to anyone who might be supposed to suggest that it was excusable.

Mr. McNEILL Will the right hon. Gentleman be good enough to reply to the question as to whether he has taken any steps to avoid that danger, in view of recent experience?

Sir J. SIMON I hope the hon. Gentleman has as much confidence in the Attorney-General as I have.

Mr. PRINGLE Would my right hon. Friend say whether he does not think it inadvisable to advertise such an insignificant and obscure organisation?

Mr. OUTHWAITE Is the right hon. Gentleman aware that these people are guided by a publication which has a large circulation, which says, "Blessed are the peacemakers," and will he have this book suppressed?

http://hansard.millbanksystems.com/commons/1915/jun/30/peace-committee
_________________

"Omdat ik alles beter weet is het mijn plicht om betweters te minachten."
Marcel Wauters, Vlaams schrijver en kunstenaar 1921-2005
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
Percy Toplis



Geregistreerd op: 9-5-2009
Berichten: 13581
Woonplaats: Suindrecht

BerichtGeplaatst: 30 Jun 2010 21:46    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

The Road to Chunuk Bair - Wanganui & the Great War

Wednesday 30th June 1915 - At 9 am. the Coy takes over sub-posts 4.5.6 at Quinn’s Post from 17th Ruahine Coy.
The day passed quietly until 9.30 pm. when a heavy thunder-storm came up. The night was intensely dark and lit at times by dazzling lightning flashes. The Turks evidently fearing an attack poured in a terrific rifle and machine-gun fire which varied in intensity until about 11 p.m. when then rain cleared off and the moon rose. The rest of the night passed fairly quietly both sides sniping and throwing bombs.
Pte R.J. Dunn was slightly wounded.
Men detached as body-guard to Sir Ian Hamilton returned to duty.
The following were sent to Hospital Sick
10/469 Pte Lankshear A.V. 10/486 Ryan P.
10/444 Pte Murray W.H. 10/1803 Eichler C.H.
10/1878 Pte Lavell A.J. 10/381 L/Cpl Hill F.J.

http://www.wanganuilibrary.com/ww1/2010/06/30/wednesday-30th-june-1915/
_________________

"Omdat ik alles beter weet is het mijn plicht om betweters te minachten."
Marcel Wauters, Vlaams schrijver en kunstenaar 1921-2005
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
Percy Toplis



Geregistreerd op: 9-5-2009
Berichten: 13581
Woonplaats: Suindrecht

BerichtGeplaatst: 30 Jun 2010 21:49    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

1915 DIARY - Taken from 38th Brigade Royal Field Artillery War Diaries

30 June: Shelled woods as working party was reported there. Also shelled observation station in trench south of Roulers railway.

http://frankwalkerww1.blogspot.com/2008/08/1915-diary.html
_________________

"Omdat ik alles beter weet is het mijn plicht om betweters te minachten."
Marcel Wauters, Vlaams schrijver en kunstenaar 1921-2005
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
Percy Toplis



Geregistreerd op: 9-5-2009
Berichten: 13581
Woonplaats: Suindrecht

BerichtGeplaatst: 30 Jun 2010 21:52    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Dick's Diary - The 1916 war diaries of 2nd Lieut. Richard T C Willis Fleming

30 June 1916 - A very thick wet fog this morning, so I couldn't dismiss the detachments till 6:30. Bathed this morning.

General Casson has taken command up here in place of General Koe. Our water ration has now been increased to 1.5 gallons a day per man, as a lot comes up on the railway now it is finished.

The intelligence report tonight reports a considerable increase of enemy troops at all their advanced posts, and the R.F.C. think it is quite probable we shall be attacked in about four days time.

http://www.willisfleming.org.uk/dicksdiary/1916/06/
_________________

"Omdat ik alles beter weet is het mijn plicht om betweters te minachten."
Marcel Wauters, Vlaams schrijver en kunstenaar 1921-2005
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
Percy Toplis



Geregistreerd op: 9-5-2009
Berichten: 13581
Woonplaats: Suindrecht

BerichtGeplaatst: 30 Jun 2010 21:53    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

The Diary of Thomas Fredrick Littler: January-June 1916

June 30th 1916 - We stood to till 4p.m when we handed in our packs, and all personal effects, and started for the line, going forward in artillery formation, passed through Bayencourt, and Sailly-au-Bois up to Hebuterne, and the bombardment was more fierce than before and we knew we had to attack in the morning and the minutes seemed like hours.

http://www.firstworldwar.com/diaries/littlerdiary3.htm
_________________

"Omdat ik alles beter weet is het mijn plicht om betweters te minachten."
Marcel Wauters, Vlaams schrijver en kunstenaar 1921-2005
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
Percy Toplis



Geregistreerd op: 9-5-2009
Berichten: 13581
Woonplaats: Suindrecht

BerichtGeplaatst: 30 Jun 2010 21:55    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

War Diary - 9th Royal Irish Fusiliers

30 June 1916 - Y2 Day
Battn to HAMEL trench line for the assault on Enemy trenches tomorrow morning - Z Day.
This completes 7 days of bombardment during which time we have suffered 47 casualties.

http://www.webmatters.net/france/ww1_ulster_9rif.htm
_________________

"Omdat ik alles beter weet is het mijn plicht om betweters te minachten."
Marcel Wauters, Vlaams schrijver en kunstenaar 1921-2005
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
Percy Toplis



Geregistreerd op: 9-5-2009
Berichten: 13581
Woonplaats: Suindrecht

BerichtGeplaatst: 30 Jun 2010 22:03    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Belleau Wood 1918

By morning of 26 June 1918 Major Shearer of the 3rd Bn 5th Marines was able to declare:

"Woods now entirely - US Marine Corps".

On 30 June 1918 General Degoutte the commander of the 6th French Army under whom the Americans had been fighting, issued an order stating that as a result of their brilliant storming of the wood in the face of a well held and deadly defence, in all official publications from hence le Bois de Belleau would bear the name: le Bois de la Brigade de Marines. Thus it has been known since with the wood being bought by the Belleau Wood Association in 1923.

http://www.webmatters.net/france/ww1_belleau_wood.htm
_________________

"Omdat ik alles beter weet is het mijn plicht om betweters te minachten."
Marcel Wauters, Vlaams schrijver en kunstenaar 1921-2005
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
Percy Toplis



Geregistreerd op: 9-5-2009
Berichten: 13581
Woonplaats: Suindrecht

BerichtGeplaatst: 30 Jun 2010 22:17    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Josephus Daniels on the Battle of Belleau Wood, June 1918

Comprising two related actions, firstly at Chateau-Thierry from 3-4 June and then at Belleau Wood itself from 6-26 June, the Battle of Belleau Wood saw the recapture by U.S. forces of the wood on the Metz-Paris road taken at the end of May by German Seventh Army forces arriving at the Marne River around Chateau-Thierry and held by four divisions as part of the German Aisne offensive.

Reproduced below is the text of U.S. Secretary of the Navy Josephus Daniel's account of the battle.

U.S. Secretary of the Navy Josephus Daniels on the Battle of Belleau Wood

It was June 6th that the attack of the American troops began against Belleau Wood and its adjacent surroundings, with the wood itself and the towns of Torcy and Bouresches forming the objectives.

At 5 o'clock the attack came, and there began the tremendous sacrifices which the Marine Corps gladly suffered that the German fighters might be thrown back.

The marines fought strictly according to American methods - a rush, a halt, a rush again, in four-wave formation, the rear waves taking over the work of those who had fallen before them, passing over the bodies of their dead comrades and plunging ahead, until they, too, should be torn to bits. But behind those waves were more waves, and the attack went on.

"Men fell like flies," the expression is that of an officer writing from the field. Companies that had entered the battle 250 strong dwindled to 50 and 60, with a Sergeant in command; but the attack did not falter. At 9.45 o'clock that night Bouresches was taken by Lieutenant James F. Robertson and twenty-odd men of his platoon; these soon were joined by two reinforcing platoons.

Then came the enemy counter-attacks, but the marines held.

In Belleau Wood the fighting had been literally from tree to tree, stronghold to stronghold; and it was a fight which must last for weeks before its accomplishment in victory.

Belleau Wood was a jungle, its every rocky formation containing a German machine-gun nest, almost impossible to reach by artillery or grenade fire. There was only one way to wipe out these nests - by the bayonet. And by this method were they wiped out, for United States marines, bare-chested, shouting their battle cry of "E-e-e-e-e y-a-a-hh-h yip!" charged straight into the murderous fire from those guns, and won!

Out of the number that charged, in more than one instance, only one would reach the stronghold. There, with his bayonet as his only weapon, he would either kill or capture the defenders of the nest, and then swinging the gun about in its position, turn it against the remaining German positions in the forest.

Such was the character of the fighting in Belleau Wood; fighting which continued until July 6th, when after a short relief the invincible Americans finally were taken back to the rest billet for recuperation.

In all the history of the Marine Corps there is no such battle as that one in Belleau Wood. Fighting day and night without relief, without sleep, often without water, and for days without hot rations, the marines met and defeated the best divisions that Germany could throw into the line.

The heroism and doggedness of that battle are unparalleled. Time after time officers seeing their lines cut to pieces, seeing their men so dog tired that they even fell asleep under shellfire, hearing their wounded calling for the water they were unable to supply, seeing men fight on after they had been wounded and until they dropped unconscious; time after time officers seeing these things, believing that the very limit of human endurance had been reached, would send back messages to their post command that their men were exhausted.

But in answer to this would come the word that the line must hold, and, if possible, those lines must attack. And the lines obeyed. Without water, without food, without rest, they went forward - and forward every time to victory.

Companies had been so torn and lacerated by losses that they were hardly platoons, but they held their lines and advanced them. In more than one case companies lost every officer, leaving a Sergeant and sometimes a Corporal to command, and the advance continued.

After thirteen days in this inferno of fire a captured German officer told with his dying breath of a fresh division of Germans that was about to be thrown into the battle to attempt to wrest from the marines that part of the wood they had gained.

The marines, who for days had been fighting only on their sheer nerve, who had been worn out from nights of sleeplessness, from lack of rations, from terrific shell and machine-gun fire, straightened their lines and prepared for the attack. It came - as the dying German officer had predicted.

At 2 o'clock on the morning of June 13th it was launched by the Germans along the whole front. Without regard for men, the enemy hurled his forces against Bouresches and the Bois de Belleau, and sought to win back what had been taken from Germany by the Americans.

The orders were that these positions must be taken at all costs; that the utmost losses in men must be endured that the Bois de Belleau and Bouresches might fall again into German hands.

But the depleted lines of the marines held; the men who had fought on their nerve alone for days once more showed the mettle of which they were made.

With their backs to the trees and boulders of the Bois de Belleau, with their sole shelter the scattered ruins of Bouresches, the thinning lines of the marines repelled the attack and crashed hack the new division which had sought to wrest the position from them.

And so it went. Day after day, night after night, while time after time messages like the following travelled to the post command:

Losses heavy. Difficult to get runners through. Some have never returned. Morale excellent, but troops about all in. Men exhausted.

Exhausted, but holding on. And they continued to hold on in spite of every difficulty. Advancing their lines slowly day by day, the marines finally prepared their positions to such an extent that the last rush for the possession of the wood could be made.

Then, on June 24th, following a tremendous barrage, the struggle began.

The barrage literally tore the woods to pieces, but even its immensity could not wipe out all the nests that remained, the emplacements that were behind almost every clump of bushes, every jagged, rough group of boulders.

But those that remained were wiped out by the American method of the rush and the bayonet, and in the days that followed every foot of Belleau Wood was cleared of the enemy and held by the frayed lines of the Americans.

It was, therefore, with the feeling of work well done that the depleted lines of the marines were relieved in July, that they might be filled with replacements and made ready for a grand offensive in the vicinity of Soissons, July 18th.

And in recognition of their sacrifice and bravery this praise was forthcoming from the French:

Army Headquarters, June 30, 1918

In view of the brilliant conduct of the Fourth Brigade of the Second United States Division, which in a spirited fight took Bouresches and the important strong point of Bois de Belleau, stubbornly defended by a large enemy force, the General commanding the Sixth Army orders that henceforth, in all official papers, the Bois de Belleau shall be named "Bois de la Brigade de Marine."

DIVISION GENERAL DEGOUTTE,
Commanding Sixth Army


Source Records of the Great War, Vol. VI, ed. Charles F. Horne, National Alumni 1923, http://www.firstworldwar.com/source/belleau_daniels.htm
_________________

"Omdat ik alles beter weet is het mijn plicht om betweters te minachten."
Marcel Wauters, Vlaams schrijver en kunstenaar 1921-2005
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
Percy Toplis



Geregistreerd op: 9-5-2009
Berichten: 13581
Woonplaats: Suindrecht

BerichtGeplaatst: 30 Jun 2010 22:19    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

30 June 1919 Pvt Gilbert Shope, Co D, 142nd Infantry, US Army.

Born 29 December 1893 at Rockford, Mercer County, Ohio, Gilbert was a farm labourer before entering service at Rockford on 22 July 1918. After training at Camp Sherman, Ohio, he was assigned to Co G of the 336th Infantry before being sent to France in September 1918, where he was transferred to the 142nd Infantry.

After returning to the US, he was sent to Ft Benjamin Harrison for medical treatment, but took his own life at the home of his mother in Indianapolis on 30 June 1919. He is buried in Crown Hill Cemetery, Indianapolis.

http://www.westernfrontassociation.com/component/content/1335.html?task=view
_________________

"Omdat ik alles beter weet is het mijn plicht om betweters te minachten."
Marcel Wauters, Vlaams schrijver en kunstenaar 1921-2005
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
Percy Toplis



Geregistreerd op: 9-5-2009
Berichten: 13581
Woonplaats: Suindrecht

BerichtGeplaatst: 30 Jun 2010 22:21    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

30 June 1919 → Commons Sitting → EX-KAISER.

STEPS TO PREVENT DEPARTURE FROM HOLLAND.


HC Deb 30 June 1919 vol 117 cc597-8 597

Mr. BOTTOMLEY asked the Secretary of State for Foreign Affairs whether any steps have been taken in conjunction with the Dutch authorities to prevent the escape of the Kaiser?

Mr. HARMSWORTH The Allied Governments have, through their representatives at the Hague, represented to the Netherland Government the necessity for taking adequate steps to prevent the departure of the ex-Kaiser from Holland.

Mr. BOTTOMLEY Is the hon. Gentleman aware that, according to the newspaper report, the ex-Kaiser has threatened to commit suicide rattier than take his trial—[HON. MEMBERS "Let him!"]— and will the Government do its best to facilitate this expeditious and inexpensive solution?

Mr. G. DOYLE asked the Prime Minister whether, in view of the recent German treachery at Scapa Flow, he can state whether adequate measures have been taken to ensure the delivery of the ex-Kaiser for trial and to prevent his rescue, disappearance, or escape from justice; and whether any negotiations have taken place, or agreement been reached, between His Majesty's Government and the Government of the Netherlands on the subject of his extradition?

Mr. HARMSWORTH I have been asked to take this question. As regards the 598 first part, I would refer my hon. Friend to the reply which I have to-day given to a similar question asked by the hon. Member for South Hackney. As regards the second part of the question no negotiations for the extradition of the ex-Kaiser have been entered into.

Colonel YATE Have the German naval ratings at Scapa Flow been put in a jail or interned with German prisoners of war?

Mr. HARMSWORTH That is a question for the Admiralty.

Lieut.-Colonel A. POWNALL asked the Prime Minister what steps have been taken to prevent the escape of the ex-Kaiser from Holland in view of his having to appear for trial before an international tribunal?

Mr. HARMSWORTH I have been asked to answer this question, and would refer my hon. and gallant Friend to the reply which I have to-day given to a similar question asked by the hon. Member for South Hackney.

http://hansard.millbanksystems.com/commons/1919/jun/30/steps-to-prevent-departure-from-holland
_________________

"Omdat ik alles beter weet is het mijn plicht om betweters te minachten."
Marcel Wauters, Vlaams schrijver en kunstenaar 1921-2005
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
Percy Toplis



Geregistreerd op: 9-5-2009
Berichten: 13581
Woonplaats: Suindrecht

BerichtGeplaatst: 30 Jun 2010 22:58    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

The Battle of the Somme

Friday, June 30: The weather report is favourable for tomorrow. With God’s help, I feel hopeful. The men are in splendid spirits. The wire has never been so well cut, nor the Artillery preparation so thorough.
Haig, Diary

If the success of any operation were entirely dependent on the preparations made before Zero Hour, then the Somme should have been a complete success.
Memories of Captain RJ Trounshell, Princess Victoria’s Fusiliers
_________________

"Omdat ik alles beter weet is het mijn plicht om betweters te minachten."
Marcel Wauters, Vlaams schrijver en kunstenaar 1921-2005
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
Yvonne
Admin


Geregistreerd op: 2-2-2005
Berichten: 45457

BerichtGeplaatst: 30 Jun 2011 0:20    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Nelson Victor Carter, Company Sergeant Major 4th Company, 12th Battalion, Royal Sussex Regiment. Date of act of bravery; 30th June, 1916, for most conspicuous bravery.
During an attack he was in command of the fourth wave of the assault. Under intense shell and machine-gun fire he penetrated, with a few men, into the enemy's second line and inflicted heavy casualties with bombs. When forced to retire to the enemy's first line, he captured a machine-gun and shot the gunner with his revolver. Finally, after carrying several wounded men into safety, he was himself mortally wounded, and died in a few minutes. His conduct throughout the day was magnificent."

Nelson Victor Carter was born at Hailsham in April 1887. He joined the Royal Field Artillery in the years before the Great War, and was a typical old soldier covered in tattoos: he had images of Buffalo Bill on both his fore-arms! Carter served for some years until a hernia resulted in his discharge. He had hoped to take up Police employment in Hailsham, but again his injury prevented this, so he re-enlisted under the name of Nelson Smith until the military authorities discovered what he had done, and discharged him again. He then sought employment in the Eastbourne area, where he became a Cinema Commissionaire at the Old Town Cinema in Eastbourne, one of the first in the area. He was a formidable character - being over six foot tall!

In August 1914 he joined the 11th Battalion Royal Sussex Regiment (1st South Downs), his regimental number being SD/4. Due to previous military experience he was made an immediate Corporal, and then Sergeant, and when the 12th Battalion was formed in October 1914 he was transferred and made Company Sergeant Major of A Company. He took them through training at Cooden, Maidstone and then Witley, before they moved to France in March 1916.

The action at Richebourg on 30th June 1916 was part of a series of diversionary raids for the Battle of the Somme. 12th Bn were heavily involved around a position known as The Boar's Head. It was here Carter captured a German machine-gun. Later in the day the survivors were evacuating the wounded: Carter was taking the lion's share of this work, being a big man. As they pulled in the last casualty he was shot and killed by a German sniper.

http://battlefields1418.50megs.com/vc3.htm
_________________
Met hart en ziel
De enige echte

https://twitter.com/ForumWO1
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht Verstuur mail Bekijk de homepage
Yvonne
Admin


Geregistreerd op: 2-2-2005
Berichten: 45457

BerichtGeplaatst: 30 Jun 2011 0:21    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

The Boar’s Head

Richebourg 30th June 1916



" And so closed the youth or maturity... of many a Sussex worthy."

Edmund Blunden - Undertones of War


The Boar’s Head is not a battle honour you’ll find in any history of the Great War. It was an obscure salient in the German lines around the tiny village of Richebourg l’Avoue in northern France. Formed after the Battle of Aubers Ridge in May 1915, the trenches here were once part of the German support line and following meagre success new front line positions were established which would remain the same until April 1918, when the German offensive broke. The Boar’s Head was so named because the westward pointing salient it created looked like the head of a boar. For units occupying the line here, this salient had given the Germans the upper hand and had enabled them to lay enfilade fire on forward trenches, patrols in No Man’s Land and wiring parties. It had been a thorn in the side of the British army for some time, and local commanders had long wished to be rid of it. That opportunity finally came in June 1916.

Plans for the Battle of the Somme dated back to late 1915, and as the Anglo-French offensive approached in the early summer of 1916 it had become much more of a British affair, given the drastic situation at Verdun. Disguising the huge build-up on the Somme had proved problematic, and in an attempt to confuse the Germans as to the true location of the attack, a number of diversionary operations were planned. The best known is the assault at Gommecourt, but it is largely forgotten that others took place as well. The 1st Division attacked the Double Crassier at Loos on 30th June (well recounted in Giles Eyre’s Somme Harvest) and in Flanders the 41st Division carried out some local operations at Ploegsteert. In northern France the 39th Division was allocated to a similar action at the Boar’s Head

http://battlefields1418.50megs.com/boars_head.htm
_________________
Met hart en ziel
De enige echte

https://twitter.com/ForumWO1
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht Verstuur mail Bekijk de homepage
Yvonne
Admin


Geregistreerd op: 2-2-2005
Berichten: 45457

BerichtGeplaatst: 30 Jun 2011 0:25    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

On July 1st 2006 the eyes of the world fell upon the Somme area of France, as we remembered the 1st day of the Battle of the Somme, a black day in the history of the twentieth century. There were ceremonies both official and unofficial throughout the region to pay respect to the thousands of men who paid the ultimate price on that day.

Little wonder then, perhaps, that 30th June has slipped past largely unnoticed for the last eighty-nine years. Yet that day held great significance for the people of Sussex, for the 30th of June became known as

“The day Sussex died.”

Between the towns of Bethune and Armentieres, in the Pas de Calais, lies Richebourg l’Avoue. Richebourg is surrounded by other villages and small towns, some with slightly more familiar names, at least to those with an interest in the Great War. Aubers, Festubert, and Neuve Chapelle are just some of the scenes of battles fought in 1915. Mention Richebourg to many people and their response is an unknowing look or a shrug of the shoulders. Yet Richebourg played a significant, if somewhat dubious, role in the Battle of the Somme, and an infamous one in the history of Lowther’s Lambs, officially the 11th, 12th and 13th (Southdowns) Battalions of The Royal Sussex Regiment.


The Battle of the Boar’s Head, Richebourg l’Avoue, was planned as a diversionary action to make the German Command believe that this area of the Pas de Calais was the one chosen for the major offensive of 1916. The intention was to prevent the Germans from moving troops to the Somme area, some fifty kilometres to the south.



British troops had been fighting in the area since 1914. The 2nd and 5th Battalions of The Royal Sussex, had fought at Richebourg during the Battle of Aubers Ridge, in May 1915, and in June of 1916 came the turn of the three Southdowns Battalions, which together formed the 116th (Southdowns) Brigade of the 39th Division, which had arrived in France on March 5th, 1916, taking over trenches in the Fleurbaix sector on March 20th.

On the 11th of June, the three Battalions went to the Divisional Reserve, being billeted around Locon, and commenced training for an attack (though this was still only a rumour). On June 16th they returned to the front line trenches in the Ferme du Bois area near Richebourg, holding the line until June 23rd, when news was received that the 39th Division were to make an attack on the Boar’s Head, a salient of the German lines, and that the 116th Brigade, the Southdowners, had been chosen to lead the attack. Further training followed. A replica of the battlefield had been built behind the lines, but the battalions had only days, not weeks, to consider it.

Initial plans had been that the 11th Battalion should lead the attack, with the 12th on their right, and the 13th in reserve. At the time that these orders were received, Lieutenant Colonel Harman Grisewood, was the Commanding Officer of the 11th (1st Southdowns). Grisewood had lost his brother George, the Adjutant of the 11th Battalion until March 1916, who died of illness, his obituary says of pneumonia, though Neville Lytton states meningitis, at Merville on March 27th 1916. His death had deeply affected Colonel Grisewood, who, it is said, on seeing the plans, was concerned that if his untried troops attacked over unfamiliar ground a disaster might result, and is said to have informed his brigade commander


" I am not sacrificing my men as cannon-fodder!"
Lees verder:
http://www.royalsussex.org.uk/Richebourg.htm
_________________
Met hart en ziel
De enige echte

https://twitter.com/ForumWO1
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht Verstuur mail Bekijk de homepage
Yvonne
Admin


Geregistreerd op: 2-2-2005
Berichten: 45457

BerichtGeplaatst: 30 Jun 2011 0:36    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Inhuldiging van de uitbreiding Musée Somme 1916
30-06-2011 -
Musée Somme 1916 - Albert
De officiële openingsplechtigheid van de uitbreiding Musée Somme te Albert
_________________
Met hart en ziel
De enige echte

https://twitter.com/ForumWO1
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht Verstuur mail Bekijk de homepage
Yvonne
Admin


Geregistreerd op: 2-2-2005
Berichten: 45457

BerichtGeplaatst: 30 Jun 2011 0:39    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

June 30, 1916

In Louvencourt, a village in the Somme district of France, the soldiers of the Newfoundland Regiment (Lieutenant-Colonel A.L. Hadow in command) leave their billets in twos and threes and head to the assembly point, falling in at 9 p.m. When the platoon sergeants call the roll,
776 men—including 66 brand-new reinforcements—answer to their names and 25 officers take their posts. LCol Hadow mounts his horse and at a wave of his hand, the Newfoundland Regiment steps out for Beaumont Hamel. Left behind are Major James Forbes-Robertson and 10 percent of the soldiers to form the core of a new battalion should the next day’s battle go badly.


The five-hour approach march takes the Newfoundlanders down the road to Acheux and then across bullet-lashed fields to a great communication trench called Tipperary Avenue and finally to St. John’s Road, their section of support trench. Despite the hour, sleep is not on the agenda, for here the heavier battle stores—trench ladders, bridge sections—must be shared out. As well as 75 pounds of personal weapons and equipment, each soldier will carry gear for tearing down and burrowing through the enemy defences. Everyone gets a hot breakfast, so the battalion’s “10-percenters” form carrying parties to bring food some 5 km from the regimental cookers at Engelbelmer to St. John’s Road. Those not otherwise employed spend the night smoking, chatting, even snoozing in full confidence that the morning’s assault could bring the great victory that will begin the end of the war. Well-marked lanes have been cut through the British wire, and the artillery will crush the German defences.

The beginning of the artillery bombardment at 6:25 a.m. informs everyone for miles around that battle is imminent. At 7:20 a.m., a gigantic explosion and a shower of debris from the detonation of an enormous mine near the German front line announces that the assault is due at any minute. The Newfoundlanders are with the 88th Brigade in the middle of the third wave of the 29th Division, 1 000 metres to the right of the fresh mine crater. In the Y-shaped German trench system opposite the 29th Division front, the machine-gunners of the 119th Reserve Regiment wait in sturdy bunkers for the bombardment to lift, as lift it must to let the assault companies advance. Their weapons are already trained on the clearly visible gaps in the British wire.

Ten minutes after the mine detonation, the first assault companies emerge from the 29th Division’s front trenches to find German machine-gun crews already set up in shell-holes forward of their own trenches and in the mine crater. Backed by artillery in positions untouched by British counter-battery fire, the German infantry produces an amazing volume of rifle and machine-gun fire that annihilates some of the lead units within five minutes. The battalions in the second line of the 29th Division begin to move at 8:05, and the full force of German artillery and small-arms fire hits them before they even clear their own front trench. At Divisional Headquarters, reports of white flares seen in the German front line are interpreted to mean the first objectives have been reached—they’re German flares, unfortunately—so the attack continues.

LCol Hadow receives his final orders by telephone at 8:45, when it is obvious to everyone that the battle is not going according to plan. “As soon as possible”, the Newfoundland Regiment is to advance and attack the concave front in the opposite trench system, where the German machine-gunners will be able to hit them from at least one side as well as from in front. “Has the enemy’s front line been captured?” asks LCol Hadow. “The situation is not cleared up,” replies the staff officer at the other end of the telephone.

After the battle, the Newfoundland Regiment has only about a dozen survivors capable of answering to their names when the roll is called, and Maj Forbes-Robertson eventually establishes that all 26 officers and 593 of the soldiers who climbed out of St. John’s Road behind LCol Hadow are dead or wounded, and 91 soldiers are missing.

http://www.forces.gc.ca/site/commun/ml-fe/article-eng.asp?id=2902
_________________
Met hart en ziel
De enige echte

https://twitter.com/ForumWO1
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht Verstuur mail Bekijk de homepage
Yvonne
Admin


Geregistreerd op: 2-2-2005
Berichten: 45457

BerichtGeplaatst: 30 Jun 2011 0:41    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Battle of the Somme

IRISH SOLDIER
BATTLE ACTION




The Battle of the Somme saw some of the bloodiest actions fought during the First World War. The Somme Campaign was fought on a huge front, made up of many small battles. Described below are some of those battles.


Thiepval Wood

On the night of the 30 June, 1916, the men of the 36th (Ulster) Divison moved into the trenches in Thiepval Wood in preparation for the Battle of the Somme the following day.
At zero hour - 07.30, 1st July, two of the three brigades of the Division, 108 and 109, spearhead the attack, with the third Brigade 107, in reserve. 108 Brigade would attack with two battalions on either side of the River Ancre plus the 15th Bn. Royal Irish Rifles of 107 Brigade. Their objectives were the railway station at Beaucourt and the machine-gun posts in St Pierre Divion. 109 Brigade would attack the most heavily fortified position on the German Front Line, the Schwaben Redoubt. As the battle commenced things went well for the Ulstermen, but then disaster struck. The fortified village of Thiepval was to be attacked and taken by the 32nd Division but after suffering very heavy casualties, the 32nd Division by-passed the village. Then the guns of the village were turned to the men of the 109 Brigade, inflicting very heavy casualties. Despite the terrible losses, 109 Brigade got a foothold on the Schwaben Redoubt but due to lack of ammunition and reinforcements, they were forced back to the first line of German trenches.

http://www.johndclare.net/wwi2_IrishSoldier.htm
_________________
Met hart en ziel
De enige echte

https://twitter.com/ForumWO1
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht Verstuur mail Bekijk de homepage
Yvonne
Admin


Geregistreerd op: 2-2-2005
Berichten: 45457

BerichtGeplaatst: 30 Jun 2011 22:47    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

War Diary Entry: 30th June 1916


Quote:
Bombardment does not appear to be more intense than usual, probably because the 2 extra days bombardment has reduced the daily expenditure of ammunition for the big guns. They have done very little shelling into Englebelmer the last 2 days. The bde hd qrs moved up into the deep dugout in Fethand St (the battle hd qrs) about 8pm. There was certainly very little German shelling going on at that time. After dark the 88th Bde arrived and the crowd of officers and orderlys in our dugouts was quite impossible. We had to send some back to make room. After dark I went along to see Pierce at the Inniskillings hd qrs, they had begun a bombardment of our trenches in that part of the line, and the air was rather thick for a bit. The KOSBs and Borders marched up from Acheux Wood at dusk, and took up their places in the trenches in good time. After that the 2 battns of the 88th Bde moved in to the 3rd line trenches (St Johns Rd) getting in between 1 & 2 am; by that time all the trenches were packed with men and no movement was possible.


Lees verder:
http://somme95.blogspot.com/2011/06/war-diary-entry-30th-june-1916.html
L
_________________
Met hart en ziel
De enige echte

https://twitter.com/ForumWO1
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht Verstuur mail Bekijk de homepage
Finnbar
Moderator


Geregistreerd op: 5-11-2009
Berichten: 6976
Woonplaats: Uaso Monte

BerichtGeplaatst: 29 Jun 2012 20:54    Onderwerp: War Diary of the Accrington Pals Reageer met quote

30th June (1916) - 6.15 p.m.

Marched via Courcelles to position in assembly trenches
(arriving in position 4 a.m. 1 July).

http://www.pals.org.uk/pals_diary.htm
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht Verstuur mail
Finnbar
Moderator


Geregistreerd op: 5-11-2009
Berichten: 6976
Woonplaats: Uaso Monte

BerichtGeplaatst: 30 Jun 2012 8:41    Onderwerp: The Day Sussex Died: 30th June 1916 Reageer met quote

The Day Sussex Died: 30th June 1916

Tomorrow is the anniversary of the Battle of the Somme, but today is another anniversary – of a forgotten battle from the same year.

On 30th June 1916 the men of the 11th, 12th and 13th Battalions Royal Sussex Regiment (South Downs) fought a two and a half hour battle in the German lines close to the ‘Boar’s Head’ at Richebourg in Northern France. More than 360 South Downs men were killed and 1,100 wounded or missing. Veterans called it ‘The Day Sussex Died’.

The South Downs were unusual in Sussex as they were the nearest the county had to ‘Pals’ battalions; this photo shows men of the 1st South Downs at Cooden Camp near Bexhill on Sea, during their training there in September 1914. At this stage there were very few uniforms and most men slept under canvas. Morale in this unit was very high; something that continued well after the war as the Old Comrades Association continued to meet until 1979 and the last South Downer died in the early 1990s.

Zie: http://greatwarphotos.com/2012/06/30/the-day-sussex-died-30th-june-1916/
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht Verstuur mail
Percy Toplis



Geregistreerd op: 9-5-2009
Berichten: 13581
Woonplaats: Suindrecht

BerichtGeplaatst: 30 Jun 2016 10:42    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Daily Telegraph - June 30 1914

Sarajevo is put under martial law in the wake of Archduke Franz Ferdinand's assassination.

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/ww1-archive/10931621/Daily-Telegraph-June-30-1914.html
_________________

"Omdat ik alles beter weet is het mijn plicht om betweters te minachten."
Marcel Wauters, Vlaams schrijver en kunstenaar 1921-2005
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
Berichten van afgelopen:   
Plaats nieuw bericht   Plaats Reactie    Forum Eerste Wereldoorlog Forum Index -> Wat gebeurde er vandaag... Tijden zijn in GMT + 1 uur
Pagina 1 van 1

 
Ga naar:  
Je mag geen nieuwe onderwerpen plaatsen
Je mag geen reacties plaatsen
Je mag je berichten niet bewerken
Je mag je berichten niet verwijderen
Ja mag niet stemmen in polls


Powered by phpBB © 2001, 2002 phpBB Group