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Accacia



Geregistreerd op: 24-11-2013
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BerichtGeplaatst: 29 Aug 2014 16:24    Onderwerp: Vier gratis cursussen te volgen via de BBC Reageer met quote

Zie de website http://bbcsignups.external.bbc.co.uk/inxmail4/d?q00ls3dq0ffkmm00d000000000000000h04wwkri3855. Ik schreef in voor die over de luchtoorlog. Ben benieuwd.
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Finnbar
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Geregistreerd op: 5-11-2009
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BerichtGeplaatst: 29 Aug 2014 19:03    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Verplaatst naar Musea en Tips
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shabu
Cheffin


Geregistreerd op: 7-2-2006
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BerichtGeplaatst: 30 Aug 2014 9:52    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Bedankt voor de tip!

Ik heb me ingeschreven voor "Trauma and Memory"
Lijkt me erg interessant.
_________________
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Tell them, because our fathers lied
-Rudyard Kipling-

http://ww1relics.com/
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Accacia



Geregistreerd op: 24-11-2013
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BerichtGeplaatst: 25 Okt 2014 17:30    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Ondertussen een week ver in de (gratis) cursus over de luchtoorlog. Is een mix van korte video's, artikels en, voor wie wenst te participeren, online discussies. Uiteraard met de nodige bibliografische verwijzigingen. Wie nog wil inschrijven, kan dat via de link http://www.futurelearn.com/courses/ww1-aviation.

Hieronder, om jullie een idee te geven, de inhoud van de module "The changing battle space: British military air power, 1914 – 1918":

"This article will explore how military air power had an increasingly important influence on the nature of warfare during the conflict.

Whilst the major achievement of aviation in the pre-First World War period was in the very act of leaving the ground, air power had evolved in such a rapid fashion that, by 1918, the majority of modern air power roles had been developed. As historian Tami Davis Biddle has written, the First World War ‘tested theory and became the anvil on which new aerial missions were forged’.

British military aviators made an important, if disputed, contribution to the manoeuvre warfare of 1914 – particularly in the reconnaissance role during the Battle of the Marne; providing timely updates that helped to inform the intelligence picture available to senior commanders on the ground. However, there was still something entirely novel about the application of air power in the first years of the conflict. Tactical and operational practices were still in their infancy, and operations were generally conducted by small, uncoordinated groups of aircraft. Moreover, the equipment and technology available was of very limited capability, and aircraft had severely limited offensive potential.

As the experience of aviators grew, and the British Army came to understand how air power could support its approach to warfare, the use of aircraft came to play an increasingly important role. Aerial photography helped the British plan the Neuve Chapelle offensive in 1915 and, by 1916, given the overwhelming significance of indirect artillery fire to the execution of battle, the role of aerial artillery observation became vital. To ensure that such support was available in a continuous and uninterrupted fashion, the Battle of the Somme was preceded by an intense, dedicated campaign to seize control of the air from the German Air Service. By 1917, the support afforded by air power to the British Army was so essential that its senior commanders felt that preparations for the Battle of Passchendaele hinged on the ability of the Royal Flying Corps (RFC) to establish control of the air.

As Jonathan Boff demonstrates, by 1918, aircraft were an integral aspect of Britain’s all-arms concept of warfare, performing a wide variety of roles, including contact and resupply patrols, anti-armour and ground attack operations, and battlefield interdiction. Thus, at the conclusion of the conflict, air power, undertaken and supported on an industrial scale, was a professional and coordinated activity, utilising sophisticated operational techniques and specialist aircraft. Of course, significant debate exists as to the efficiency and effectiveness of British military air power during the conflict, with Major-General Sir Hugh Trenchard’s command of the RFC singled out for strong criticism.

In spite of further debate, reflecting bitter animosity between the personalities involved, and a wider historiography that traditionally characterises British Generals as ‘butchers and bunglers,’ the British Army and its senior commanders, particularly Field Marshals Sir John French and Sir Douglas Haig, were enthusiastic supporters of air power during and before the First World War. As these commanders came to see the tangible benefits of air power, specifically for reconnaissance, artillery observation, and the ability to control the airspace above the battlefield, they supported the massive expansion of Britain’s air power capabilities.

In terms of personnel alone, the RFC deployed to France in August 1914 with some 105 officers, 755 men. A year later, the total strength of the Corps stood at 7,234 officers and men, 42,185 by August 1916, and 144,078 in March 1918. In terms of squadron strength, the RFC took four squadrons to France in 1914, rising to 27 squadrons in 1916, 50 in 1917. In 1918, the Royal Air Force had 99 squadrons in France alone. The budget for air power had risen from less than £10,000 in 1909 / 1910 to over £60 million in the Air Estimates of 1919. As Major-General Seely, Under-Secretary of State for Air, noted, had the war continued beyond 1918, these estimates would have stood at £200 million."
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kloefeleize



Geregistreerd op: 1-7-2006
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BerichtGeplaatst: 27 Okt 2014 9:38    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Ik schreef me in voor alle vier + academic writing in Enlglish. t' Ja gepensioneerd hé. Use it or loose it.
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Geregistreerd op: 28-3-2005
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BerichtGeplaatst: 04 Nov 2014 20:34    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Leuk en sympathiek initiatief! Ik ga ook voor luchtoorlog.

Gr P
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BerichtGeplaatst: 09 Sep 2015 18:52    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Er komt weer een interessante cursus aan in november.

World War 1: Lessons and Legacy of the Great War.
Learn how the Allies defeat the Germans in World War 1, how the memory arose that the war was futile, and why this view is untrue.

Lees meer:
https://www.futurelearn.com/courses/ww1-lessons-legacy/
_________________
If any question why we died
Tell them, because our fathers lied
-Rudyard Kipling-

http://ww1relics.com/
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