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Hobart Amory Hare (aka Hobey) Baker (1892-1918)

 
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Percy Toplis



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BerichtGeplaatst: 09 Jun 2010 12:08    Onderwerp: Hobart Amory Hare (aka Hobey) Baker (1892-1918) Reageer met quote

Hobart Amory Hare (aka Hobey) Baker (1892-1918)

Hobart Amory Hare Baker (January 15, 1892 – December 21, 1918), known as Hobey Baker, was a noted American amateur athlete of the early 20th century. He was the only member of both the College Football Hall of Fame and Hockey Hall of Fame, and U.S. college hockey's annual award for most outstanding player is named in his honor. When the Hockey Hall of Fame was founded in 1945, Baker was one of the original twelve inductees. (...)

When the country entered World War I in 1917, he enlisted in the U.S. Army as a pilot and left for Europe. By 1918, he was a member of the United States Army Air Service, commanding the 103rd Aero Squadron, whose members consisted mainly of veterans of the Lafayette Escadrille. He painted his Spad XIII orange-and-black in honor of his alma mater, Princeton.

Contrary to the newspaper accounts of his day, however, Baker was not an ace. He had only three confirmed kills to his name, rather than the necessary five. He was, nonetheless, awarded the Croix de Guerre by the French government for his service. Just a few weeks after the armistice ending the war, he was killed in a plane crash near Toul while test-flying one of his squadron's newly repaired Spads. Ironically, his orders to return home to the United States were found tucked inside his jacket. He is buried in West Laurel Hill Cemetery, Bala Cynwyd, Pennsylvania.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hobey_Baker
Zie ook http://library.sps.edu/06archives/war/ww1/pdf/Baker_Hobart_Amory_Hare.pdf
Zie ook http://www.findagrave.com/cgi-bin/fg.cgi?page=gr&GRid=12863
_________________

"Omdat ik alles beter weet is het mijn plicht om betweters te minachten."
Marcel Wauters, Vlaams schrijver en kunstenaar 1921-2005


Laatst aangepast door Percy Toplis op 09 Jun 2010 12:17, in toaal 2 keer bewerkt
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Percy Toplis



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BerichtGeplaatst: 09 Jun 2010 12:10    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

The Main Line home to one of all-time hockey greats
By Harry R. Neilson III, June 09, 2010

BALA CYNWD — The Main Line will never be known as a bastion of ice hockey; even so, Bala Cynwyd produced one of the most famous hockey players of all time, Hobart Amory Hare (aka Hobey) Baker (1892-1918), whom even the Canadians dubbed, “The King of Hockey.”

Although hockey might have been an unfamiliar sport and a novelty in many parts of our area until the 1960s, it was already well-known among the old-money Main Liners who had played the game in prep school. Many of them became Flyers’ charter season ticket holders.

Until the explosion of American sports culture in the postwar era, ice hockey in the northeastern United States was a game almost exclusively of the schoolboy elite who had attended prestigious New England prep schools like St. Paul’s and Groton.

Also, until the 1967 NHL expansion, except in the upper Midwest, upstate New York, and New England, hockey was considered unusual, mostly because both natural and artificial ice was extremely rare. As late as the 1960s, many prep school teams still played on outdoor rinks on natural ice.

To be sure, there could be no ice hockey without ice skating, a popular pastime in and around Philadelphia beginning in the first half of the 19th century. As with many aspects of American culture at the time, Philadelphia led the way. There was skating on the Schuylkill and Delaware rivers and on ponds throughout the city and environs.

The Philadelphia Skating Club and Humane Society, now based in Ardmore, was founded in 1849. Its original clubhouse, built in 1861 on Boathouse Row, survives today as the Philadelphia Girls’ Rowing Club. It was named the Skating Club and Humane Society not because it protected animals but because its members carried ropes and were dedicated to rescuing skaters who frequently fell through the ice.

The need for rescue was ever present. Indeed, prominent Philadelphia physician and author S. Weir Mitchell (1829-1914) describes in a letter dated Jan. 14, 1849 that a huge sheet of ice with several hundred skaters on it broke free from the Schuylkill and flowed over the Fairmount Dam.

Up until the early 1980s, Lower Merion’s Arrowmink Pond (aka Mitchell pond) originally owned by the descendants of S. Weir, was the one of the centers of pond hockey on the Main Line.

When freezing weather blessed the pond with ice, it became the scene of pick-up hockey games, open to anyone with skates and a stick. Many of the participants were local students and alumni of St. Paul’s (SPS) in Concord, N.H., where in 1883 the first hockey game anywhere in the United States was played. The sportswriters of the time called the school “the cradle of American hockey.”

Bala Cynwyd-born Hobey Baker, who attended SPS from 1903-1910, made the varsity hockey team in his fourth form year at age 15. Back then, the SPS hockey team played against some of the best college teams in the East and often beat them.

Baker went on to Princeton where he captained both the hockey and football teams. To date, he is the only athlete elected to both the College Football Hall of Fame and the National Hockey League Hall of Fame, and the only amateur in both the Canadian and American Hockey Halls of Fame.

Baker was a media darling, and, by all accounts, a legend in his own time. While playing for Princeton in 1914, after a post-season hockey game in Ottawa, the Canadians crowned Baker the “King of Hockey.” This was the era par excellence of intercollegiate sport.

Before WWI, there was no professional hockey league in the United States; no college had an indoor rink, and college hockey teams played their games on big city artificial rinks with big city crowds in attendance and with major newspaper coverage.

Baker was a natural for the crowds and the papers. Speedy, skillful, handsome, disciplined, he was an innovator in all the sports he played. He would have had a hard time being a Broad Street Bully, however; for he was the epitome of the gentleman athlete of the era, having been penalized only twice over his entire post-high school career.

After college, Baker went on to play hockey for New York’s St. Nick’s, one of the top amateur clubs of the pre-NHL era. Hobey Baker met a premature end in a plane crash during WWI; he is buried in West Laurel Hill Cemetery.

Baker is commemorated today by Princeton’s Hobey Baker Memorial Rink and by the eponymous award given to college hockey’s top player (college hockey’s equivalent of the Heisman Trophy), won in 2006 by Flyers’ defenseman Matt Carle while at the University of Denver.

Philadelphia’s old-money, prep school connection to hockey continued with the arrival of the Flyers in the 1967 expansion. Many of the charter season ticket-holders who personally hand-picked the front rows of Section 301 (center ice, second level) as the best seats to view the game were a Who’s Who of Main Line society. Many had themselves played hockey at New England prep schools and were intimately familiar with the game’s synthesis of graceful finesse and controlled violence.

The old Spectrum is where social lines were blurred and the prep school blue bloods mixed happily with the blue collars of South Philly. There, although on opposite ends of the class scale, but in their own way so typical of Philadelphia society, these two disparate groups became one in their love for a game which has its origins as a prep school sport of the monied elite.

The Main Line will never be known for ice hockey, but it can boast that one of its own, Hobey Baker, “The King of Hockey,” was, by all contemporary accounts, one of the greatest hockey players who ever played the game.

http://www.mainlinemedianews.com/articles/2010/06/09/main_line_times/sports/doc4c06807ac822d427249670.txt
_________________

"Omdat ik alles beter weet is het mijn plicht om betweters te minachten."
Marcel Wauters, Vlaams schrijver en kunstenaar 1921-2005
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Percy Toplis



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BerichtGeplaatst: 09 Jun 2010 12:11    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Hobey Baker Award

The Hobey Baker Award is an annual award given to the top National Collegiate Athletic Association men's ice hockey player.

It is named for hockey player and World War I veteran Hobey Baker, who played collegiately at Princeton University and learned the game at St. Paul's School (Concord, New Hampshire).

Eleven of these players have gone on to have respectable NHL careers later in life.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hobey_Baker_Memorial_Award
Zie ook http://www.hobeybaker.com/
Zie ook http://query.nytimes.com/mem/archive-free/pdf?_r=1&res=9C0DE7D71E39E133A25754C1A9649D946395D6CF
_________________

"Omdat ik alles beter weet is het mijn plicht om betweters te minachten."
Marcel Wauters, Vlaams schrijver en kunstenaar 1921-2005
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
Percy Toplis



Geregistreerd op: 9-5-2009
Berichten: 14953
Woonplaats: Suindrecht

BerichtGeplaatst: 21 Dec 2017 8:50    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

December 21, 1918: Hobey Baker killed in plane crash

On this day in 1918, the 26-year-old collegiate and amateur ice hockey star Hobey Baker is killed in a plane crash in Toul, France, just after the end of World War I.

After beginning his hockey career at St. Paul’s School in Concord, New Hampshire, Baker played four seasons of hockey at Princeton University in New Jersey, leading his team to two intercollegiate championships in 1912 and 1914. A “rover” on the Princeton team, Baker was known for his ability to cover the rink from end to end and score from various positions. He was also captain of the football team, which won a national championship in 1911. After graduating from Princeton, Baker worked for the J.P. Morgan investment bank and played amateur hockey for the Saint Nicholas Club of New York City.

Upon America’s entry into World War I in 1917, Baker enlisted in the U.S. Army as a pilot. He flew in the famous Lafayette Escadrille, an elite squadron of the French Air Force, and participated in air battles against such German aces as Manfred von Richthofen, or the “Red Baron.” During his service for the Allies, Baker painted his plane in orange and black, the colors of his beloved Princeton Tigers, and was awarded the Croix de Guerre for his superior conduct under fire. Tragically, he died in a flying accident barely a month after the armistice, while test-flying one of his squadron’s planes.

In 1945, Baker became one of the inaugural inductees into the U.S. Hockey Hall of Fame. The Hobey Baker Memorial Award is presented annually to the best college hockey player in the country; it is the equivalent of college football’s famed Heisman Trophy.

http://www.history.com/this-day-in-history/hobey-baker-killed-in-plane-crash
_________________

"Omdat ik alles beter weet is het mijn plicht om betweters te minachten."
Marcel Wauters, Vlaams schrijver en kunstenaar 1921-2005
Naar boven
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