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April: ANZAC-maand

 
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Yvonne
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BerichtGeplaatst: 03 Apr 2006 8:47    Onderwerp: April: ANZAC-maand Reageer met quote

Zie hier een sticky met de uitleg over dit topic.
http://www.forumeerstewereldoorlog.nl/viewtopic.php?t=756
Deze maand is het dus ANZACmaand geworden.
Dit is de laatste maand, dan zijn we rond.
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BerichtGeplaatst: 03 Apr 2006 10:10    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote


De Diggers in de loopgraaf in Gallipoli
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BerichtGeplaatst: 03 Apr 2006 10:25    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

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BerichtGeplaatst: 03 Apr 2006 10:29    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Alec William Campbell
26 Feb 1899 - 16 May 2002

Alec William Campbell
'the Last Sentinel of Gallipoli'


http://www.anzacs.org/campbell.html
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BerichtGeplaatst: 03 Apr 2006 12:00    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote


ANZAC soldaten in een loopgraaf bij Pozieres


Laatst aangepast door Merlijn op 03 Apr 2006 12:22, in totaal 1 keer bewerkt
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BerichtGeplaatst: 03 Apr 2006 12:19    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

ANZAC Day 25 April.

A Tribute to ANZAC Day

With their hair a little whiter, their step not quite so sure
Still they march on proudly as they did the year before.
Theirs were the hands that saved us, their courage showed the way
Their lives they laid down for us, that we may live today.

From Gallipoli's rugged hillsides, to the sands of Alamein
On rolling seas and in the skies, those memories will remain.
Of airmen and the sailors, of Lone Pine and Suvla Bay
The boys of the Dardenelles are remembered on this day.

They fought their way through jungles, their blood soaked desert sands
They still remember comrades who rest in foreign lands.
They remember the siege of old Tobruk, the mud of the Kokoda Trail
Some paying the supreme sacrifice with courage that did not fail.
To the icy land of Korea, the steamy jungles of Vietnam
And the heroic battle of Kapyong and that epic victory at Long Tan.

Fathers, sons and brothers, together they fought and died
That we may live in peace together, while at home their mothers cried.
When that final bugle calls them to cross that great divide
Those comrades will be waiting when they reach the other side.

Ken Bunker
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BerichtGeplaatst: 03 Apr 2006 13:04    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

ANZAC Slang

Abdul

a nickname for a Turkish soldier. See also 'Jacko', Johnno' and 'Johnny Turk'.

Also used as a collective noun.

'Abdul did not seem to trust the situation and was pretty active in our sector.'


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

adventurer, an

a member of the 1st Division

< nickname given by the 2nd Div. who thought they had joined for the adventure and nothing else


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alf a mo

1. one moment, please

2. a tiny moustache

< "half a moment" and by analogy "half a moustache"


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Anzac button, an

a nail used instead of a button to hold up one's trousers.


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Anzac soup

a shell hole full of water polluted by a corpse.

< probably of later origin in France


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Anzac stew

any improvised meal the troops managed to prepare from their monotonous rations.

e.g. a bucket of hot water with one rind of fat bacon in it


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Anzac wafer, an

a hard biscuit. See 'rock-chewer'


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arsapeek

upside down. Comparable to 'arse over head'.


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Auntie, an

other name for a Turkish broomstick bomb. See also there.

Used as a warning : ' Auntie coming over !'

< probably connotation of household character of the real thing


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Australian eleven

moustache of young recruits

< form (?) : | |


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Aussie, (an)

1. Australian (adj.)

2. An Australian soldier

3. A sufficiently severe injury to be shipped back to Australia.

Compare : the English equivalent 'a Blighty (wound)'

< abbrev. / diminut.


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axle grease

butter


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

backshish

(backsheesh, buckshee)

- (begging for) cigarettes / chocolate

- offering services as a guide etc.

< Arab.


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bags of

a lot, a great number, a great amount

'We had bags of shrapnel on the beach last night.'


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

banger, a

a sausage


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banjo, a

a shovel. 'Swinging the banjo' was used for digging.

'Banjo-swinging went on all night to fortify the newly-captured trench.'


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

base wallah, a

someone with a (relatively) safe job at base, far behind the front line.


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Beachy Bill

one of the Turkish guns that regularly shelled the beach at Anzac.


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

beetle, a

a landing craft for 200 men


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

belly ache, a

a serious, often mortal wound

also used as a verb : 'He was always belly-aching about the food.'


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

bergoo

porridge

< Arab (?)


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Birdie

General Birdwood who, according to the troops, was a 'decent enough bloke'

<abbrev.


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

bivvy, a

bivouac

<abbrev.


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

body-snatcher, a

- a stretcher bearer

- a member of a raiding party, as they often had to try and bring in a prisoner for information


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

bonzer

very, very ... , expressing a superlative quality of something. See also : 'boshter', 'bosker'.


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

boshter

very, very ... , expressing a superlative quality of something. See also : 'bonzer', 'bosker'.


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

bosker

very, very ... , expressing a superlative quality of something. See also : 'bonzer', 'boshter'.


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

boots-i-clean

no real meaning, used as interjection

< broken English of Arab street vendors who wanted to clean the soldiers' boots


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

brass, brass hat

nickname for higher officers

< insignia on cap and uniform


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

broomstick bomb, a

a Turkish contraption : a 4-inch cartridge filled with high explosive + metal scraps + percussion cap, on a 2 inch thick and 5 ft long stick.

(They) '...used to come soaring over the lines with a broomstick swaying on the end and burst with a noise like a thunderstruck battleship : if it fell close to a man, it was useless to pick up the pieces - there weren't any.'


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

buckshee

see 'backshish'.


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

bully (beef)

Tinned beef, which (together with dry biscuits) formed the basis of rations at Gallipoli, as it was always available in abundance. It was hated by the troops, and not only for its monotony. After being stored for a length of time on the beaches in the hot Turkish climate, it all too often turned into a liquid mass of fat. A well-known trench story has it that when supplies were thrown across nomansland to the Turkish positions, a tin of bully came sailing back, together with a note on which was scribbled : 'cigarettes yes, bully beef no'.The only exception to the rule was perhaps 'Maconochie's', a brand of tinned beef that was appreciated by all for its superior quality.


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

bumbrusher, a

The personal servant of an officer. A 'batman'.


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

buzz off

to go or run away


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

camel dung

Egyptian cigarettes.

< the smell, according to the troops


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

chat, a

a louse. See also 'crab'.


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

chat, to

remove lice and other vermin from one's clothing


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

chat-bags

(under-) clothing


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

chatty

verminous


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Chocs

Members of the 8th Brigade AIF that arrived in Egypt just after the Gallipoli campaign was over, and therefore did not take part in the fighting. This well-drilled brigade under Col. E. Tivey were afterwards referred to by the Gallipoli veterans as 'Tivey's Chocolate soldiers', 'Tivey's Chocs' or 'Tivey's Pets'.


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

clobber

clothes


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

clout, a

a wound


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

cobber, a

a mate, a friend


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

coffin nail, a

a cigarette. See also : 'camel dung'.


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

cool, a

someone reluctant to join the AIF, someone still living in Australia. Mostly used in plural form.


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

cow, a

an obnoxious person (or thing for that matter) in whose company a 'dinkum' soldier would not be seen


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

crab, a

a louse. Mostly used in plural form. See also 'chat'.


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

cricket ball

a Turkish handgrenade of that shape and size. Depending on the length of the fuse, it was often possible to hurl them back before they exploded in a trench.

< shape + the action of throwing


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

curio, a

a battlefield souvenir, usually taken from a dead enemy. See also 'souvy'.


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

deep thinkers

men belonging to reinforcements in the last stages of the campaign, often members of the 3rd Div.

See also : 'dinkums', 'chocs', 'cools'

< length of time needed to take the decision to join.


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

digger, a

Anzac soldier

< 1916 France (!) and not from Hamilton's cable, as gererally believed < adopted by australians from N.Z. gum diggers. Common usage by 1917


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

dinkum

real, original, vintage

dinkum Aussies / Fair Dinkums : volunteers, either men belonging to the first units that were formed mainly for the 1st Div., or -contrary to that- men belonging to the 2nd Div. who did not join 'for adventure'.

dinkum oil : true news

< name of trench publication in 1st Div. June-July 1915, to counteract 'spy-mania'


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

divvy, a

a division

< diminutive


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

dry rations

a sermon

< anal.? with uncooked food issued to the troops


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

eggs-a-cook

boiled eggs sold by Arab street vendors.

Later on, in Gallipoli it was used by the troops as a war-cry when going 'over the top'.

< Arab. street vendors


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

En-Zedders

New Zealanders

<abbrev. / found on uniforms


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

fantass, a

(fantassies)

- a 10-gallon tank of water, used in pairs on mules

- a flat tank used for the carriage of water on camel back. One camel carried two of these.


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

furphy, a

a camp rumour

< Broadmeadows Camp (Melbourne) where the name 'Furphy Shepparton' was found on 'sanitary carts' that visited the camp, and therefore brought news from outside. Later the word was taken along to Egypt.

The Furphy engineering company made small water carts. The troops in the training camps would gather around these carts for a drink and exchange information. The stories or rumours that circulated became known as Furphies. Among other things, the company also manufactured a range of steel cooking pots, known as camp ovens, to cook stews, roast meat or bake bread.


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Gallipoli gallop, the

diarrhoea cfr. also 'Turkey trot'


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

gawk (act), a

an exhausting 'stunt' (or small operation), that accomplished nothing else, as far as the troops could see


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Gippo

Egyptian. See also 'Gypo'

< abbrev.


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

greybacks

lice.

Lousing, the elimination of 'greybacks' soon became an important activity with all troops in and out of the lines.


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

grungey

self-made dish consisting of bully beef + biscuits + onion + water and salt, and then heated.


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

gutzer, a

a piece of bad luck, a misfortune


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Gypo

(Gyppo, Gippo)

Egyptian, and derived from that, also "to be gypt" (= to be conned)

< abbrev.


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

igri

hurry up

< Arab.


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Imshi Yalla

go away

< Arab.


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Jacko

(Johnny) Turk, also 'Johnno'

'We're among the wavin' date-palms, making Jacko Turkey-trot. And sincerest Xmas Greetings, from this gawd-forsaken spot.'


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

jam tin (bomb), a

crude bomb made from a jam tin filled with an explosive charge, metal scraps, lengths of barbed wire or empty cartridges, and then given a fuse. As the supply of bombs during the campaign was very insufficient, a 'factory' for the manufacturing of these 'jam tins' was established inside Anzac Cove.


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Johnno

see 'Jacko'


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

kangaroo feathers

the emu plumes at one side of a Light Horseman's hat, in fact a patch of emu hide with the feathers still attached. Among the Arabs, the Light Horsemen became known as 'the Kings of the Feathers'.

< a joke, to mislead English troops who asked what they were


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Kiwi

New Zealander

< New Zealand bird (apteryx)


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

knocked (out)

killed or wounded


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

lance corporal bacon

very fat bacon, with only one streak of lean running through it

< comparison to 1 stripe on uniform


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

lazy liz, a

a big shell fired by the battleship Queen Elisabeth and passing overhead with 'a lazy drone'.

< Liz, Lizzie, nickname for the Queen Elisabeth.


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Linseed Lancers, the

Austr. Field Ambulance men

< nickname


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Liz, Lizzie

the battleship Queen Elisabeth


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Luna Park

Cairo Hospital

< anal. with Mena - ?


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Maconochie's (stew)

see 'bully beef'

< company name


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

mafeesh

(mafish)

finished, not available anymore

'When we finally reached the place, all eggs were mafeesh.'

< Arab.


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

maleesh

never mind, it doesn't matter

< Arab.


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

mate, a

Aussies did not have friends, they had 'mates'


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Maxwell's pink-eyed bastards

The men of the 17th Battalion AIF, who were proud that none of them had taken part in the '2nd Battle of the Wozzer' and therefore got congratulations from the British Government in Egypt. When they landed in Gallipoli afterwards, this fact earned them their nickname.


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

misquies

bad

Derived from quies(-kiteer). See there.

< derived from Arab


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

O.C. Dunks

quartermaster responsible for batt. mules

< abbrev. of self-made : Officer Commanding Donkeys


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

oil

information, news. See also 'Dinkum oil'.


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

oringhes

oranges

< Arab. street vendors


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

outed

killed, taken care of


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Peninsh, the

The Gallipoli Peninsula

< abbrev.


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

pill, a

a bullet


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

possie, a

(possy)

a firing position, but also a hole excavated in the side of a trench to rest

< abbrev.


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

quies-kiteer

- very good, excellent

- ok, alright

< Arab


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

red-caps, the

British military police

< uniform


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

rock-chewer, a

a dry biscuit, responsible for many broken teeth and dentures, a problem that was even aggravated by the fact that originally there were no dentists (nor any instruments for dental surgery) with the medical services on Gallipoli

'I broke my dentures - my top plate - on an army biscuit. So then I had to manage these iron biscuits with only my bottom teeth. I used my entrenching tool to powder them as best I could.'


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

saida

- good-day

- later also used as a noun for an Egyptian.

'Saidas were not allowed within the confines of the camp.'

< Arab.


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

salaam

good day. See also 'saida'.

< Arab.


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

sap, a

anything that was not regarded as a regular (firing) trench. A 'sap' could as well be a short part of a trench, branching off into nomansland for observation, as a big communication trench leading to the lines, as a shortcut between different trenches. Could also be used as a verb : 'The enemy were sapping towards the big crater in nomansland'.

'The Big Sap' was the big sea-side communication trench that connected Anzac Cove to the Outposts.'


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

short arm inspection

medical inspection of the privates' private parts to look for cases of VD, especially when still stationed in Egypt.


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

shrapnel

apart from the explosive, also used for the chicken peas that Australian POW's in Turkey sometimes found as an addition to their standard daily ration of boiled wheat.


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

six bob a day tourists

nickname for members of the 1st Division. See also 'dinkums', 'adventurers'.


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

smoko, a

a break for a cigarette


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

snipe, to

to shoot at the enemy from a hidden position.

'Sniping' soon became specialist work during the campaign, and was turned into fine art by a number of Australian marksmen to subdue the constant Turkish firing. In general, a 'sniper' worked together with a 'spotter' who was equipped with a trench periscope. Numerous diaries speak about man-to-man duels being fought out with Turkish colleagues.

'The troops manning Quinn's Post were continually being sniped on from the Chessboard.'


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

souvenir, to

- to try and find battlefield trophies after an engagement

- to try and steal something useful, for instance from an army dump.

'After our spell in the trenches, we went souveniring for firewood.'


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

souvy, a

a battlefield trophy or souvenir, usually taken from a dead enemy. See also 'curio'.

< abbrev. 'souvenir'


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

S.R.D.

seldom reaches destination

< Supply Reserve Depot, the inscription found on rum-jars


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

stay at home, a

(stay at homer)

someone reluctant to enlist. See also 'cool'


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

stiff, a

a corpse, a dead soldier


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

stiffs' paddock, a

a graveyard


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

stunt, a

originally a small-scale operation, involving a relatively small body of men, but later also used for bigger enterprises

'There is a big stunt on at Lone Pine this afternoon.'


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

stouch, to

also : to stoush

to fight, hit, kill or use violence in general.

'The Battle of the Wozzer was a good stouch.'


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

taube, a

German airplane, used for reconaissance over the lines, but also capable of dropping explosive 'eggs'

< German : 'pigeon'


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

throw a seven, to

to get killed

< dicing, probably because with two dice a seven is the most common number to be thrown.


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tourist, a

a member of the 1st Division. See 'six bob a day tourists'


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Turkey trot, the

diarrhoea, also known as 'the trots', 'the runs'

See. also 'Gallipoli gallop'


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typewriter, a

a machine-gun


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

wallah, a

a man, a person. See also 'a base wallah'

< Arab


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

wangle, to

to acquire through some sort of trick or clever scheme.

'In addition to our biscuits, we sometimes managed to wangle a shapati from the Indian troops'.


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

wazzah, a

a dugout

'Me and my mate were living in the same wazzah.'

< deriv. from the 'Haret el Wasser', the red-light district in Cairo. See Wozzer.


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Wazzir, the

see 'Wozzer,the'


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

whizz-bang, a

german 77 mm shell

< onomatopoeic


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wind up, to have the -

to be scared


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

woodbine, a

an English soldier

< their most common brand of cigarettes


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Wozzer, the

Cairo's red-light district

< Haret el Wasser.

2 'battles' were fought there by drunk Australian and New Zealand troops, the first one on 2nd April (Good Friday) 1915 and the second one by the 2nd Div. some months later. On both occasions a lot of damage was done in the district : local people were molested, furniture thrown out of windows and even houses set on fire.


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

write-off

a casualty, a corpse, a ruined military vehicle




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BerichtGeplaatst: 03 Apr 2006 13:22    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote


ANZAC day 2004 Ieper
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BerichtGeplaatst: 03 Apr 2006 16:59    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Zo maar wat gezichten van de ANZAC's







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BerichtGeplaatst: 03 Apr 2006 17:04    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote





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BerichtGeplaatst: 12 Apr 2006 22:17    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Was CoH William Thomas Leggett de eerste Australiër die sneuvelde op het Westelijke Front ?
Tot eind vorig 2000 werd aangenomen dat die kans bijzonder groot was, aangezien de Australische troepen (de ANZACs) pas op 25 april 1915 op het Weste-lijke Front in actie kwamen.
Er was alleen een onofficiële theorie over een Australiër in Engelse dienst die in het najaar van 1914 stierf ten gevolge van een ongeval achter het front in Frankrijk.

Op vraag van Des Akers uit Melbourne (Australië) verrichtte het Australian War Memorial in 2000 onderzoek om zekerheid te hebben over het feit of Leggett nu wel of niet als 'eerste Australiër' kan beschouwd worden.
Dat onderzoek bracht gegevens aan het licht die zelfs in Australië tot dan toe in feite onbekend bleken te zijn : er sneuvelden zeker zes militairen met een thuisadres in Australië, maar in Engelse dienst, vóór 14 oktober 1914 !

Mogelijk is Leggett ook niet de eerste die sneuvelt in België omdat Pte. Frederick Thomas vermist wordt in de grensstreek van België met Frankrijk tijdens de terugtocht van Mons.

We mogen wel met zo goed als 100 % zekerheid aannemen dat Leggett de eerste is van de vele duizenden Australiërs die sterven in de strijd om Ieper.

Maar… of hij nu de eerste of de laatste is, het feit dat een jong mensenleven verloren ging, blijft het écht belangrijke !

Hieronder volgen de namen van de zes Australiërs die vóór Leggett sneuvelden en die door het AWM opgespoord werden. (Het is niet uitgesloten dat er nog meer zijn.)

Private 6803
1st Bn., Queen's Own (Royal West Kent Regiment)
FREDERICK THOMAS
who died on
Monday, 24th August 1914. Age 33.
Husband of Charlotte Atkins, of Blampied, Victoria, Australia.
commemorative information
LA FERTE-SOUS-JOUARRE MEMORIAL, Seine-et-Marne, France

Corporal 58714
122nd Bty., Royal Field Artillery
FRANK LETHERBARROW
who died on
Wednesday, 26th August 1914. Age 23.
Son of Mr. and Mrs. P. L. Letherbarrow, of "Roseville," Nicholl St., Lakemba, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia.
commemorative information
LA FERTE-SOUS-JOUARRE MEMORIAL, Seine-et-Marne, France

Private L/7915
1st Bn., The Queen's (Royal West Surrey Regt.)
J H AYRES
who died on
Thursday, 27th August 1914. Age 33.
Son of James and Elizabeth Ayres; husband of Sarah Emily Harvey (formerly Ayres, of "Benal-la," Rowell Crescent, Kilkenny, South Australia.
commemorative information
ST. SOUPLET BRITISH CEMETERY, Nord, France
Grave I. F. 19.

Lance Serjeant 12472
2nd Bn., Grenadier Guards
ALBERT JOHN CAESAR
who died on
Friday, 4th September 1914.
Husband of E. Pocock (formerly Caesar), of "The Laurels", Myall St., Oatley, New South Wales.
commemorative information
GUARDS GRAVE, VILLERS COTTERETS FOREST, Aisne, France
Grave 34

Captain
9th (Queen's Royal) Lancers
DOUGLAS KEITH LUCAS LUCAS-TOOTH DSO
who died on
Monday, 14th September 1914. Age 33.
Son of Robert Lucas Lucas-Tooth and Helen Lucas-Tooth, of Sydney, New South Wales, Australia.
commemorative information
MOULINS NEW COMMUNAL CEMETERY, Aisne, France
Grave 9.

Captain
Northamptonshire Regiment
ROBERT EDDINGTON GORDON
who died on
Tuesday, 15th September 1914. Age 37.
Son of George and Violette E. Gordon, of "Ellerslie", Gordon St., Toorak, Melbourne, Australia.
commemorative information
LA FERTE-SOUS-JOUARRE MEMORIAL, Seine-et-Marne, France

http://www.westhoek.be/williamleggett/info/gesneuvelden.htm
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BerichtGeplaatst: 12 Apr 2006 22:19    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

ANZAC-biscuits zijn een typische lekkernij uit Australië en Nieuw-Zeeland.
Het recept dateert uit de Eerste Wereldoorlog en de naam van de koekjes verwijst naar het Australian and New Zealand Army Corps dat toen een onderdeel was van het Britse leger.
Het gaat om een variante op 'Scottisch oatcakes' - een recept dat door Schotse immigranten meegebracht werd naar Australië en Nieuw-Zeeland. Deze haverkoekjes werden naar de soldaten op het westelijke front in Europa gestuurd en in het thuisland werden ze in de straten of op tuinfeesten verkocht om geld in te zamelen voor de oorlogsslachtoffers.
Door een aanpassing van het oorspronkelijke recept, konden de koekjes niet bederven tijdens hun lange zeereis naar Europa en de toevoeging van geraspte kokosnoot en 'golden syrup' aan de traditionele ingrediënten, zorgen voor de typische smaak van deze 'ANZAC-bickies' (om het eens in echt Australisch te zeggen.)
In Australië en Nieuw-Zeeland zijn de koekjes nog steeds heel populair. Je vindt ze - zelfgebakken - in elk huishouden en schoolkinderen maken en verkopen ze wanneer ze geld willen inzamelen voor een goed doel.
Ze zijn niet alleen een herinnering aan de oudstrijders van 14-18, maar ook een uiting van het sterke nationale gevoelen dat door en sinds die oorlog in Australië en Nieuw-Zeeland ontstond.


Ingrediënten

* 100 gram gewone huishoudbloem
* 150 gram kristalsuiker
* 75 gram havermout
* 75 gram geraspte kokosnoot
* 100 gram boter of margarine
* 1 eetlepel gele rietsuikerstroop ('Golden Syrup')
* 1 theelepel natriumbicarbonaat
* 2 eetlepels kokend water

Werkwijze

* Bloem, suiker, havermout en kokos mengen in een kom.
* Boter en rietsuikerstroop smelten.
* Natriumbicarbonaat oplossen in kokend water en bij de gesmolten boter + stroop voegen.
* Dit mengsel bij het 'droge' mengsel voegen en alles goed dooreen roeren.
* Koekjes maken en op een ingevet bakblik leggen.
* (1 koekje = ongeveer 1 eetlepel deeg (als je de koekjes dun en krokant wil, neem je kleine schepjes deeg ; wil je ze dikker en taaier om te kauwen, neem dan een royale schep))
* 15 minuten (of tot ze een goudbruine kleur hebben) laten bakken in een voorverwarmde oven op ca. 175°C.
* Omdat de deegbolletjes in de oven wel eens durven openvloeien en je zo één grote ANZAC-biscuit bekomt, wordt de raad gegeven om in dat geval de nog hete koek met een mes in koekjes te verdelen van zodra die uit de oven komt : dan is alles nog zacht en laat het zich zonder breken versnijden.

http://www.westhoek.be/williamleggett/info/anzac-biscuits.htm
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Geregistreerd op: 17-2-2005
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BerichtGeplaatst: 18 Apr 2006 15:35    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Quote:
May 8, 1915
By Ellis Ashmead-Bartlett

It required splendid skill, organisation, and leadership to get the huge armada under way from Mudros Bay, on the south of Lemnos Island, in the Aegean Sea, without accident. The warships and transports were divided into five divisions.

Never before had an attempt been made to land so large a force in the face of a well-prepared enemy. At 2 o'clock in the afternoon of April 24 the flagship of the division, conveying the Australians and New Zealanders, passed down the long line of slowly moving transports, amid tremendous cheering, and was played out of Mudros Bay by French warships. At 4 o'clock the ship's company and the troops assembled to hear Admiral de Roebeck's proclamation to the combined forces.

This was followed by the last service before battle, in which the chaplain uttered the prayer for victory and called the Divine blessing on the expedition. All stood with uncovered and bowed heads.

At dusk the bugle sounded for "all lights out", and the troops rested for the ordeal that they were to undergo at dawn next day.

It was a beautiful calm night, with a bright half-moon shining.

By 1 o'clock in the morning the ships had reached the rendezvous, five miles from the appointed landing place, and the soldiers were aroused and served with the last hot meal.

The Australians, who were about to go into action for the first time in trying circumstances, were cheerful, quiet, and confident. There was no sign of nerves nor of excitement.

As the moon waned, the boats were swung out, the Australians received their last instructions, and the men who six months ago had been living peaceful civilian lives had begun to disembark on a strange and unknown shore in a strange land to attack an enemy of a different race.

Every eye was fixed on the grim line of hills in the front, menacing in the gloom, and the mysteries of which those in the boats were about to solve.

Not a sound was heard, and when a light was seen it appeared as if the enemy had been surprised. In our nervy state the stars were often mistaken for lights ashore.

The progress of the boats was slow, and dawn was rapidly breaking.

At 10 minutes to 4 o'clock the enemy showed an alarm light, which flashed for ten 10 minutes, and then disappeared.

Our boats appeared almost as one on the beach, and seven torpedo-boat destroyers glided noiselessly inshore, and at seven minutes to 4 o'clock came a sharp burst of rifle-fire from the beach. The sound relieved the prolonged suspense, which had become almost intolerable.

The Australians rose to the occasion. Not waiting for orders, or for the boats to reach the beach, they sprang into the sea, and, forming a sort of rough line, rushed at the enemy's trenches.

Their magazines were not charged, so they just went with cold steel.

It was over in a minute. The Turks in the first trench were either bayonetted or they ran away, and their Maxim was captured.

Then the Australians found themselves facing an almost perpendicular cliff of loose sandstone, covered with thick shrubbery. half-way up, the enemy had a second trench, strongly held, from which they poured a terrible fire on the troops below and the boats pulling back to the destroyers for the second landing party.

Here was a tough proposition to tackle in the darkness, but those colonials, practical above all else, went about it in a practical way. They stopped for a few minutes to pull themselves together, got rid of their packs, and charged their magazines.

Then this race of athletes proceeded to scale the cliffs without responding to the enemy's fire. They lost some men, but did not worry.

In less than a quarter of an hour the Turks were out of their second position, either bayonetted or fleeing.

There has been no finer feat in this war than this sudden landing in the dark and storming the the heights, above all holding on whilst the reinforcements were landing ...

A serious problem was getting to the wounded from the shore. All those unable to hobble had to be carried from the hills on stretchers, and then their wounds hastily dressed and the men carried to the boats.

The courage displayed by these wounded Australians will never be forgotten.

Though many were shot to bits, without the hope of recovery, their cheers resounded throughout the night. You could see in the midst of the mass of suffering humanity arms waving to the crews of the warships.

They were happy because they had been used for the first time and had not been found wanting.

http://www.smh.com.au/articles/2006/04/17/1145126045731.html
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