Forum Eerste Wereldoorlog Forum Index Forum Eerste Wereldoorlog
Hét WO1-forum voor Nederland en Vlaanderen
 
 FAQFAQ   ZoekenZoeken   GebruikerslijstGebruikerslijst   WikiWiki   RegistreerRegistreer 
 ProfielProfiel   Log in om je privé berichten te bekijkenLog in om je privé berichten te bekijken   InloggenInloggen   Actieve TopicsActieve Topics 

14 juni

 
Plaats nieuw bericht   Plaats Reactie    Forum Eerste Wereldoorlog Forum Index -> Wat gebeurde er vandaag... Actieve Topics
Vorige onderwerp :: Volgende onderwerp  
Auteur Bericht
Hauptmann



Geregistreerd op: 17-2-2005
Berichten: 11547

BerichtGeplaatst: 14 Jun 2006 6:00    Onderwerp: 14 juni Reageer met quote

June 14

1917 U.S. President Woodrow Wilson gives Flag Day address

On June 14, 1917, as the soldiers of the American Expeditionary Force (AEF) travel to join the Allies on the battlefields of World War I in France, United States President Woodrow Wilson addresses the nation’s public on the annual celebration of Flag Day.

Just the year before, on May 30, 1916, Wilson had officially proclaimed June 14 “Flag Day” as a commemoration of the “Stars and Stripes”—adopted as the national flag on June 14, 1777, when the design featured just 13 stars representing the original 13 states.

In his Flag Day address on June 14, 1917, barely two months after the American entry into World War I, Wilson spoke strongly of the need to confront an enemy—Germany—that had, as he had said in his April 2 war message to Congress, violated the principles of international democracy and led the world into “the most terrible and disastrous of all wars, civilization itself seeming to be in the balance.” In the June 14 speech, after repeating the distinction he had made in earlier speeches between the German people and their leaders, Wilson absolved the former of guilt and listed the numerous transgressions of the latter—U-boat warfare, espionage, the attempt to build an alliance with Mexico against the U.S.—that had provoked the U.S. into declaring war.

The “military masters of Germany,” Wilson declared, were a “sinister power that has at last stretched its ugly talons out and drawn blood from us.” He also asserted that Germany, at the head of the Central Powers, had started the war to create “a broad belt of…power across the very center of Europe and beyond the Mediterranean into the heart of Asia.” Most disturbingly for pacifist listeners and critics of the speech, Wilson dismissed all previous peace proposals, given the fact that they had all been based on terms favorable to Germany. As journalist Philip Snowden wrote in the Labour Leader, “Six months ago President Wilson was the greatest hope for peace. Today he is probably the greatest obstacle to it.”

On a less rhetorical and more practical note, Wilson also declared in his Flag Day speech that the initial transport of AEF troops would be followed, as quickly as possible, by the departure of more soldiers for Europe. In fact, the first U.S. troops arrived in France just 12 days later, on June 26. Though it would be more than a year before they could be trained and organized enough to play a significant role on the battlefields alongside the French and British soldiers, the eventual impact of the American entrance into World War I—both in terms of manpower, resources and economic assistance to the Allies—would be significant.

http://www.historychannel.com
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
Percy Toplis



Geregistreerd op: 9-5-2009
Berichten: 15143
Woonplaats: Suindrecht

BerichtGeplaatst: 13 Jun 2010 19:46    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

A Brief History of the 79th Cameron Highlanders of Canada Overseas Drafting Detachment, 1915-1916

The 79th Cameron Highlanders of Canada Overseas Drafting Detachment (hereafter called the 79th Draft) is one of the lesser-known units of the Canadian Expeditionary Force. It only existed for a few months – not even a year. Since CEF units were not required to keep war diaries while in Canada, there is very little documentation concerning their activities. The 79th Draft recruited in Winnipeg and Regina, and the Regina men were posted to the “Regina Platoon.”

The 79th Draft was formed in June 1915. However, it was not until June 1917 that a General Order was published authorizing its organization:

GO 63 (15 June 1917): Calling out of troops on Active Service. In virtue of Orders-in-Council by His Royal Highness, the Governor General in Council, numbered PC 2067 and PC 2068, dated 6 August 1914, the organization of the undermentioned Units of the Canadian Expeditionary Force as Temporary units of the Active Militia is authorized, in addition to the Units mentioned in GO 36 of 1915, GO 86 of 1915, GO 103a of 1915, GO 151 of 1915, GO 69 of 1916, and GO 11 of 1917, and each of the said Units is placed on Active Service from the date of its organization.

INFANTRY: 79th Regiment (Cameron Highlanders of Canada) Overseas Draft.

14 June 1915 - Recruiting began this morning for the Cameron draft company at the Regimental Headquarters at 202 Main Street (10 A.M.-Noon; 2-4 P.M.; 8-9 P.M.)

http://cameronhighlanderscanada.com/43pg7.htm
_________________

"Omdat ik alles beter weet is het mijn plicht om betweters te minachten."
Marcel Wauters, Vlaams schrijver en kunstenaar 1921-2005
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
Percy Toplis



Geregistreerd op: 9-5-2009
Berichten: 15143
Woonplaats: Suindrecht

BerichtGeplaatst: 13 Jun 2010 19:49    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

SOLDIER AND DRAMATIST, BEING THE LETTERS OF HAROLD CHAPIN, AMERICAN CITIZEN WHO DIED FOR ENGLAND AT LOOS ON SEPTEMBER 26TH, 1915.

To his Son.

June 14th, 1915.

Vallie, my blessed, thank you ever so much for your nice letter. I was very glad to get the C.O. Bird with the kiss on his beak and I am taking the greatest possible care of him but I warn you I find him very difficult, and if I do come back without him, please understand that he will be quite as much to blame as I shall.

To begin with he arrived just as I was packed up to leave "----- " and come here and I had to squeeze him into my haversack on top of Nanty Lal's tobacco and the asparagus. I buttoned him in but he popped his head out of the corner of the haversack and watched everything that was going on till some one said he was the Eye Witness---and then on the March I lost him! I was awfully upset---but he turned up a couple of miles further on sitting on one of the waggons. I had been on the waggon tying on some loose boxes and the faithful creature must have seen me there, and when he got loose found his way to the place where he had last seen me.

He lived under my tunic and trousers---that is to say under my pillow while I was ill and he must have had a very dull time because I was no sort of company:---couldn't smoke or eat or talk or do anything friendly. Now he looks after my pack when I'm out on duty and has breakfast and supper with me.

We have all had big parcels from the Red Cross Society with a shirt, a pair of socks, and brush and comb, sponge, razor and chocolate. The chocolate is from Queen Alexandra. I dunno who sent the rest exactly.

Oh Vallie---I do hope you will still like being sung to sleep when I come back and not be too big a boy to be carried sometimes. You were such a dear when I went away, just right---try to keep as nice till I come back and pray that it may be soon.

Love to you dear from your Doody.

http://net.lib.byu.edu/estu/wwi/memoir/chapin/Chapin05.htm#104
_________________

"Omdat ik alles beter weet is het mijn plicht om betweters te minachten."
Marcel Wauters, Vlaams schrijver en kunstenaar 1921-2005
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
Percy Toplis



Geregistreerd op: 9-5-2009
Berichten: 15143
Woonplaats: Suindrecht

BerichtGeplaatst: 13 Jun 2010 19:52    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

St John Ambulance

Brighton Division registered on June 14th, 1915
By David Shelton
This year the St. John Ambulance division in Brighton is celebrating its 90th anniversary. The Brighton division was registered on June 24, 1915. (...)

Origins of St. John Ambulance
Although the origins of St. John Ambulance can be traced back over 900 years to the eleventh century, today's Brighton volunteers are celebrating a mere 90 years of service to the community. It was decided to start the St John Ambulance Brigade in 1887. The Brigade still forms part of the world wide Order of St John of Jerusalem and is now recognised as the UK's leading organisation/charity in care, first aid and transport.

http://www.mybrightonandhove.org.uk/page_id__6566_path__0p116p1222p595p.aspx
_________________

"Omdat ik alles beter weet is het mijn plicht om betweters te minachten."
Marcel Wauters, Vlaams schrijver en kunstenaar 1921-2005
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
Percy Toplis



Geregistreerd op: 9-5-2009
Berichten: 15143
Woonplaats: Suindrecht

BerichtGeplaatst: 13 Jun 2010 20:05    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Abdication Proclamation of King Constantine I, 14 June 1917

Reproduced below is the text of King Constantine I's abdication proclamation of 14 June 1917. This followed an earlier ultimatum issued by the Allies on 11 June which demanded the abdication of the pro-German Constantine.

In so doing the Allies intended to install in government in Athens the decidedly pro-Allied Eleutherios Venizelos, at present based in exile in Crete, where he had controversially established an alternative Greek government. Venizelos had earlier served as Greek Prime Minister until his overtly pro-Allied sentiments led Constantine to seek his effective dismissal.

At the same time as delivering the ultimatum the Allies simultaneously invaded Thessaly and a French force occupied the Isthmus of Corinth. On 12 June 1917 Constantine duly abdicated in favour of his second son, Alexander. Two weeks after this, on 26 June, Venizelos was installed as Prime Minister, replacing Zaimis.

Abdication Proclamation of King Constantine I

Yielding to necessity, accomplishing my duty towards Greece, and having in view only the interests of the country, I am leaving my dear country with the Crown Prince, leaving my son Alexander on the throne.

Still, when far from Greece, the queen and I will always preserve the same love for the Hellenic people. I beg all to accept my decision calmly and quietly, trusting in God, whose protection I invoke for the nation.

In order that my bitter sacrifice for my country may not be in vain, I exhort you, for the love of God, for the love of our country, if you love me, to maintain perfect order and quiet discipline, the slightest lapse from which, even though well-intentioned, might be enough to cause a great catastrophe.

The love and devotion which you have always manifested for the queen and myself, in days of happiness and sorrow alike, are a great consolation to us at the present, time. May God protect Greece.

At the moment when my venerated father, making to the Fatherland the supreme sacrifice, entrusts me with the heavy duties of the Hellenic throne, I pray that God, granting his wishes, may protect Greece and permit us to see it once more united and strong.

In the grief of being separated in such painful circumstances from my well-beloved father I have the single consolation of obeying his sacred command. With all my energy I shall try to carry it out by following along the lines which so magnificently marked his reign, with the help of the people on whose love the Greek dynasty rests.

I have the conviction that, in obeying the will of my father, the people by their submission will contribute to our being able together to draw our well-beloved country out of the situation in which it now is.

Source Records of the Great War, Vol. V, ed. Charles F. Horne, National Alumni 1923, http://www.firstworldwar.com/source/greece_constantineabdication.htm
_________________

"Omdat ik alles beter weet is het mijn plicht om betweters te minachten."
Marcel Wauters, Vlaams schrijver en kunstenaar 1921-2005
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
Percy Toplis



Geregistreerd op: 9-5-2009
Berichten: 15143
Woonplaats: Suindrecht

BerichtGeplaatst: 13 Jun 2010 20:09    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

14 June 1917, Commons Sitting

TRICK-FLYING OVER CROWDED AREAS.


HC Deb 14 June 1917 vol 94 cc1127-8 1127

Mr. BILLING asked the Prime Minister whether, in view of the recent accident, he will request the Director-General of Aeronautics to discourage officers of the Royal Flying School from trick-flying over crowded areas or in the vicinity of their own homes?

Mr. MACPHERSON Flying over crowded areas, unless necessitated by a definite duty, has always been discouraged.

http://hansard.millbanksystems.com/commons/1917/jun/14/trick-flying-over-crowded-areas
_________________

"Omdat ik alles beter weet is het mijn plicht om betweters te minachten."
Marcel Wauters, Vlaams schrijver en kunstenaar 1921-2005
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
Percy Toplis



Geregistreerd op: 9-5-2009
Berichten: 15143
Woonplaats: Suindrecht

BerichtGeplaatst: 13 Jun 2010 20:11    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Woodrow Wilson: Flag Day Address, 14 June 1917

My Fellow Citizens: We meet to celebrate Flag Day because this flag which we honour and under which we serve is the emblem of our unity, our power, our thought and purpose as a nation. It has no other character than that which we give it from generation to generation. The choices are ours. It floats in majestic silence above the hosts that execute those choices, whether in peace or in war. And yet, though silent, it speaks to us,—speaks to us of the past, of the men and women who went before us and of the records they wrote upon it. We celebrate the day of its birth; and from its birth until now it has witnessed a great history, has floated on high the symbol of great events, of a great plan of life worked out by a great people. We are about to carry it into battle, to lift it where it will draw the fire of our enemies. We are about to bid thousands, hundreds of thousands, it may be millions, of our men, the young, the strong, the capable men of the nation, to go forth and die beneath it on fields of blood far away,—for what? For some unaccustomed thing? For something for which it has never sought the fire before? American armies were never before sent across the seas. Why are they sent now? For some new purpose, for which this great flag has never been carried before, or for some old, familiar, heroic purpose for which it has seen men, its own men, die on every battlefield upon which Americans have borne arms since the Revolution?
These are questions which must be answered. We are Americans. We in our turn serve America, and can serve her with no private purpose. We must use her flag as she has always used it. We are accountable at the bar of history and must plead in utter frankness what purpose it is we seek to serve.
It is plain enough how we were forced into the war. The extraordinary insults and aggressions of the Imperial German Government left us no self-respecting choice but to take up arms in defense of our rights as a free people and of our honour as a sovereign government. The military masters of Germany denied us the right to be neutral. They filled our unsuspecting communities with vicious spies and conspirators and sought to corrupt the opinion of our people in their own behalf. When they found that they could not do that, their agents diligently spread sedition amongst us and sought to draw our own citizens from their allegiance,—and some of those agents were men connected with the official Embassy of the German Government itself here in our own capital. They sought by violence to destroy our industries and arrest our commerce. They tried to incite Mexico to take up arms against us and to draw Japan into a hostile alliance with her,—and that, not by indirection, but by direct suggestion from the Foreign Office in Berlin. They impudently denied us the use of the high seas and repeatedly executed their threat that they would send to their death any of our people who ventured to approach the coasts of Europe. And many of our own people were corrupted. Men began to look upon their own neighbours with suspicion and to wonder in their hot resentment and surprise whether there was any community in which hostile intrigue did not lurk. What great nation in such circumstances would not have taken up arms? Much as we had desired peace, it was denied us, and not of our own choice. This flag under which we serve would have been dishonoured had we withheld our hand.
But that is only part of the story. We know now as clearly as we knew before we were ourselves engaged that we are not the enemies of the German people and that they are not our enemies. They did not originate or desire this hideous war or wish that we should be drawn into it; and we are vaguely conscious that we are fighting their cause, as they will some day see it, as well as our own. They are themselves in the grip of the same sinister power that has now at last stretched its ugly talons out and drawn blood from us. The whole world is at war because the whole world is in the grip of that power and is trying out the great battle which shall determine whether it is to be brought under its mastery or fling itself free.
The war was begun by the military masters of Germany, who proved to be also the masters of Austria-Hungary. These men have never regarded nations as peoples, men, women, and children of like blood and frame as themselves, for whom governments existed and in whom governments had their life. They have regarded them merely as serviceable organizations which they could by force or intrigue bend or corrupt to their own purpose. They have regarded the smaller states, in particular, and the peoples who could be overwhelmed by force, as their natural tools and instruments of domination. Their purpose has long been avowed. The statesmen of other nations, to whom that purpose was incredible, paid little attention; regarded what German professors expounded in their classrooms and German writers set forth to the world as the goal of German policy as rather the dream of minds detached from practical affairs, as preposterous private conceptions of German destiny, than as the actual plans of responsible rulers; but the rulers of Germany themselves knew all the while what concrete plans, what well advanced intrigues lay back of what the professors and the writers were saying, and were glad to go forward unmolested, filling the thrones of Balkan states with German princes, putting German officers at the service of Turkey to drill her armies and make interest with her government, developing plans of sedition and rebellion in India and Egypt, setting their fires in Persia. The demands made by Austria upon Servia were a mere single step in a plan which compassed Europe and Asia, from Berlin to Bagdad. They hoped those demands might not arouse Europe, but they meant to press them whether they did or not, for they thought themselves ready for the final issue of arms.
Their plan was to throw a broad belt of German military power and political control across the very centre of Europe and beyond the Mediterranean into the heart of Asia; and Austria-Hungary was to be as much their tool and pawn as Servia or Bulgaria or Turkey or the ponderous states of the East. Austria-Hungary, indeed, was to become part of the central German Empire, absorbed and dominated by the same forces and influences that had originally cemented the German states themselves. The dream had its heart at Berlin. It could have had a heart nowhere else! It rejected the idea of solidarity of race entirely. The choice of peoples played no part in it at all. It contemplated binding together racial and political units which could be kept together only by force,—Czechs, Magyars, Croats, Serbs, Roumanians, Turks, Armenians,—the proud states of Bohemia and Hungary, the stout little commonwealths of the Balkans, the indomitable Turks, the subtile peoples of the East. These peoples did not wish to be united. They ardently desired to direct their own affairs, would be satisfied only by undisputed independence. They could be kept quiet only by the presence or the constant threat of armed men. They would live under a common power only by sheer compulsion and await the day of revolution. But the German military statesmen had reckoned with all that and were ready to deal with it in their own way.
And they have actually carried the greater part of that amazing plan into execution! Look how things stand. Austria is at their mercy. It has acted, not upon its own initiative or upon the choice of its own people, but at Berlin’s dictation ever since the war began. Its people now desire peace, but cannot have it until leave is granted from Berlin. The so-called Central Powers are in fact but a single Power. Servia is at its mercy, should its hands be but for a moment freed. Bulgaria has consented to its will, and Roumania is overrun. The Turkish armies, which Germans trained, are serving Germany, certainly not themselves, and the guns of German warships lying in the harbour at Constantinople remind Turkish statesmen every day that they have no choice but to take their orders from Berlin. From Hamburg to the Persian Gulf the net is spread.
Is it not easy to understand the eagerness for peace that has been manifested from Berlin ever since the snare was set and sprung? Peace, peace, peace has been the talk of her Foreign Office for now a year and more; not peace upon her own initiative, but upon the initiative of the nations over which she now deems herself to hold the advantage. A little of the talk has been public, but most of it has been private. Through all sorts of channels it has come to me, and in all sorts of guises, but never with the terms disclosed which the German Government would be willing to accept. That government has other valuable pawns in its hands besides those I have mentioned. It still holds a valuable part of France, though with slowly relaxing grasp, and practically the whole of Belgium. Its armies press close upon Russia and overrun Poland at their will. It cannot go further; it dare not go back. It wishes to close its bargain before it is too late and it has little left to offer for the pound of flesh it will demand.
The military masters under whom Germany is bleeding see very clearly to what point Fate has brought them. If they fall back or are forced back an inch, their power both abroad and at home will fall to pieces like a house of cards. It is their power at home they are thinking about now more than their power abroad. It is that power which is trembling under their very feet; and deep fear has entered their hearts. They have but one chance to perpetuate their military power or even their controlling political influence. If they can secure peace now with the immense advantages still in their hands which they have up to this point apparently gained, they will have justified themselves before the German people: they will have gained by force what they promised to gain by it: an immense expansion of German power, an immense enlargement of German industrial and commercial opportunities. Their prestige will be secure, and with their prestige their political power. If they fail, their people will thrust them aside; a government accountable to the people themselves will be set up in Germany as it has been in England, in the United States, in France, and in all the great countries of the modern time except Germany. If they succeed they are safe and Germany and the world are undone; if they fail Germany is saved and the world will be at peace. If they succeed, America will fall within the menace. We and all the rest of the world must remain armed, as they will remain, and must make ready for the next step in their aggression; if they fail, the world may unite for peace and Germany may be of the union.
Do you not now understand the new intrigue, the intrigue for peace, and why the masters of Germany do not hestitate to use any agency that promises to effect their purpose, the deceit of the nations? Their present particular aim is to deceive all those who throughout the world stand for the rights of peoples and the self-government of nations; for they see what immense strength the forces of justice and of liberalism are gathering out of this war. They are employing liberals in their enterprise. They are using men, in Germany and without, as their spokesmen whom they have hitherto despised and oppressed, using them for their own destruction,—socialists, the leaders of labour, the thinkers they have hitherto sought to silence. Let them once succeed and these men, now their tools, will be ground to powder beneath the weight of the great military empire they will have set up; the revolutionists in Russia will be cut off from all succour or cooperation in western Europe and a counter revolution fostered and supported; Germany herself will lose her chance of freedom; and all Europe will arm for the next, the final struggle.
The sinister intrigue is being no less actively conducted in this country than in Russia and in every country in Europe to which the agents and dupes of the Imperial German Government can get access. That government has many spokesmen here, in places high and low. They have learned discretion. They keep within the law. It is opinion they utter now, not sedition. They proclaim the liberal purposes of their masters; declare this a foreign war which can touch America with no danger to either her lands or her institutions; set England at the centre of the stage and talk of her ambition to assert economic dominion throughout the world; appeal to our ancient tradition of isolation in the politics of the nations; and seek to undermine the government with false professions of loyalty to its principles.
But they will make no headway. The false betray themselves always in every accent. It is only friends and partisans of the German Government whom we have already identified who utter these thinly disguised disloyalties. The facts are patent to all the world, and nowhere are they more plainly seen than in the United States, where we are accustomed to deal with facts and not with sophistries; and the great fact that stands out above all the rest is that this is a Peoples’ War, a war for freedom and justice and self-government amongst all the nations of the world, a war to make the world safe for the peoples who live upon it and have made it their own, the German people themselves included; and that with us rests the choice to break through all these hypocrisies and patent cheats and masks of brute force and help set the world free, or else stand aside and let it be dominated a long age through by sheer weight of arms and the arbitrary choices of self-constituted masters, by the nation which can maintain the biggest armies and the most irresistible armaments,—a power to which the world has afforded no parallel and in the face of which political freedom must wither and perish.
For us there is but one choice. We have made it. Woe be to the man or group of men that seeks to stand in our way in this day of high resolution when every principle we hold dearest is to be vindicated and made secure for the salvation of the nations. We are ready to plead at the bar of history, and our flag shall wear a new lustre. Once more we shall make good with our lives and fortunes the great faith to which we were born, and a new glory shall shine in the face of our people.

http://wwl2.dataformat.com/HTML/30696.htm
_________________

"Omdat ik alles beter weet is het mijn plicht om betweters te minachten."
Marcel Wauters, Vlaams schrijver en kunstenaar 1921-2005
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
Percy Toplis



Geregistreerd op: 9-5-2009
Berichten: 15143
Woonplaats: Suindrecht

BerichtGeplaatst: 13 Jun 2010 20:19    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

World Aviation in 1917

14 June - Leutnant Karl Allmenroder, who honed his skills as a combat pilot under Manfred von Richthofen in Jasta 11, is awarded the Pour le Mérite. He scores 30 air combat victories during the First World War.

14 June - Zeppelin LZ92 (L43) is shot down by British aircraft over the North Sea.

http://www.century-of-flight.net/Aviation%20history/aviation%20timeline/1917.htm
_________________

"Omdat ik alles beter weet is het mijn plicht om betweters te minachten."
Marcel Wauters, Vlaams schrijver en kunstenaar 1921-2005
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
Percy Toplis



Geregistreerd op: 9-5-2009
Berichten: 15143
Woonplaats: Suindrecht

BerichtGeplaatst: 13 Jun 2010 20:23    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

NOTE FROM CHICHERIN TO THE AMERICAN CONSUL-GENERAL POOLE
ON ALLIED WARSHIPS IN RUSSIAN PORTS


14 June 1918

The People's Commissariat for Foreign Affairs requests the American Consul-General in Moscow to draw the attention of the Government of the United States. of North America to the fact that the presence of warships of the belligerent Powers in the ports of the Russian Republic, so long as they are in a position to put to sea at any time for military purposes, cannot be countenanced by the Russian Government. The People's Commissariat expresses its complete confidence that the Government of the United States of North America, which has given so many proofs of its friendly attitude towards the Russian Republic, will take into account the obligations which Russia has assumed, and make full allowance for them.

[Similar requests were made on the same day to the French and British representatives.]

http://www.marxists.org/history/ussr/government/foreign-relations/1918/June/14.htm
_________________

"Omdat ik alles beter weet is het mijn plicht om betweters te minachten."
Marcel Wauters, Vlaams schrijver en kunstenaar 1921-2005
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
Percy Toplis



Geregistreerd op: 9-5-2009
Berichten: 15143
Woonplaats: Suindrecht

BerichtGeplaatst: 13 Jun 2010 20:30    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Trench Mortar

On display in the Memorial’s First World War Gallery is this damaged trench mortar barrel. The explosion that damaged this Stokes 3″ trench mortar barrel in 1918 also sadly killed two young men from the 6th Australian Light Trench Mortar Battery.

Stokes 3″ trench mortars were made up of a barrel with a base plate at the bottom and supported by legs that had traversing and elevating gears to adjust the trajectory. Inside the bottom of the barrel was a striker pin. The mortar bomb was dropped by hand into the barrel, striking the pin. The propellant charge in the bomb shot it from the barrel and it exploded upon impact with its target. The next bomb could be loaded within seconds of the first leaving the barrel.

This mortar barrel was damaged while in use at Ville-sur-Ancre, south west of Dernancourt in France when a bomb prematurely exploded in the barrel. The walls of the mortar barrel are around 1cm thick and the force of the explosion was so great that it caused the barrel to peel back like a banana skin and pieces of shrapnel to fly off. To be near such an explosion spelt death, or major injury. In this instance the explosion killed two young men, 1936 Private James Edwin Ashton and 4475 Private William Stewart McGhee. They were both only 22 years old when they died.

Unfortunately there are no eyewitness accounts of the incident that lead to their deaths. They are noted only as being ‘killed in action’. James had served in the field with the unit for one month before he was killed. William on the other hand had served with the 6th ALTMB since May 1917. Initially he was attached to the unit from the 24th Battalion, but less than two months before he was killed he was permanently transferred to the 6th ALTMB.

Initially they were listed in the unit’s records as being killed on 14 June 1918 but, for reasons unknown, this date was later amended to 15 June – the date the barrel was collected by the Australian War Records Section (the precursor to the Australian War Memorial). James and William were buried near a track between Ville-sur-Ancre and Morlancourt. In 1920 their remains were exhumed and reburied at Beacon British Cemetery at Sailly Laurette, 6 kilometres south of where they died.

Sadly this wasn’t the only time the AIF lost men due to a prematurely exploding Stokes mortar bomb. A year earlier, at Warloy, north east of Amiens several men (most from the 6th ALTMB) died from a prematurely bursting bomb during a training exercise with battalions of the 6th Brigade, before moving to the Ypres sector. On 1 June 1917 at around 11.30am, as the last company of the 24th Battalion was advancing with support from the 6th ALTMB, a Stokes mortar shell exploded in the barrel, killing three men instantly and wounding 22.

The three men killed were 5869 Private Thomas Michael Murphy, 4128 Lance Corporal Thomas William Joyce and 5693 Private James Henry Frampton Wright.

Thomas Murphy was from East Melbourne. He dropped the bomb into the mortar barrel. He was hit in the chest by the explosion and killed immediately. He left behind a widow, Mary and two children, Leslie and Nesta. He was attached to the 6th ALTMB from the 24th Battalion.

Thomas Joyce, from Melbourne was a member of the carrying party and was in front of the barrel when the explosion occurred. Joyce was a member of the 24th Battalion and had just rejoined his unit only two days earlier after convalescing from a wound received during the Second Battle of Bullecourt on 3 May.

James Wright from Elsternwick Victoria also served with the 24th Battalion. He had emigrated to Australia from England when he was 26. He was 34 years old when he died and left behind a widow, Florence, and three young children – Winifred, James and Nora.

Of the 22 men wounded in the accident, four died. The first was 6399 Private James Robert Thomas Telfer of the 24th Battalion, from Gerang near Dimboola, Victoria. He lost a large amount of blood from a severe groin wound. He died before he even reached the dressing station and was buried, along with Murphy, Joyce and Wright that same day in a full military funeral at the Warloy-Baillon Communal Cemetery Extension.

5072 Private Charles Page from Melbourne was wounded in the chest and leg and died on his way to hospital. He served with 22 Bn but was attached to the 6th ALTMB at the time of the accident.

704 Corporal Edgar Andrew Dyring from Ballarat, Victoria was wounded in the head, wrist and thigh in the accident and died during the night. He had served with 23 Battalion, including a few months on Gallipoli from late August 1915. He was transferred to the 6th ALTMB in 1916. His brother, Hugh Dyring MM also served at Gallipoli and later transferred to the 6th ALTMB. Presumably he was there when the accident occured.

The last soldier to die as a result of the accident was 5058 Private Walters Mills from Tamleugh near Violet Town, Victoria. He was 19 years old and had served with 22 Bn, but was attached to the 6th ALTMB when he was wounded in the chest and feet by the explosion. He died the following morning. All four are buried at Dernancourt Communal Cemetery Extension.

Subsequent Courts of Enquiry found that all seven men died as a result of the premature explosion of the Stokes mortar bomb and that no one was in any way to blame for the accident.

Other men known to have been wounded in the accident but survived include:

•1068 Corporal James Mitchell with a wounded leg.
•4509 Private Robert George McShane with a fractured skull.
•2104 Private Edward Clyde Andrews with a shell wound to the abdomen.
•2357 Private James Gilchrist with a wounded right heel.
•1901 Private Percival Herbert Cannington, wounded in the right arm and leg.
•3845 Private Harry Stanley Ince, wounded in the arm and abdomen.
•4703 Private James Hubert Guyatt was wounded in the right arm and leg.
•370 Private George Albert Ellison was wounded left thigh.
•6144 Private Alexander Ramsay received a shell wound to his head.
•5344 Private Harry James Gow wounded right knee joint.

http://www.awm.gov.au/blog/2008/04/01/trench-mortar/
_________________

"Omdat ik alles beter weet is het mijn plicht om betweters te minachten."
Marcel Wauters, Vlaams schrijver en kunstenaar 1921-2005
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
Percy Toplis



Geregistreerd op: 9-5-2009
Berichten: 15143
Woonplaats: Suindrecht

BerichtGeplaatst: 13 Jun 2010 20:37    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Alcock and Brown - Great Britain
The First Non-stop Aerial Crossing of the Atlantic


Captain John Alcock and Lieutenant Arthur Whitten Brown, in a modified Vimy IV, made the first non-stop aerial crossing of the Atlantic. They took off from Lester's Field, near St. Johns, Newfoundland on June 14,1919, and landed June 15,1919, at Clifden in Ireland. The time for the crossing was sixteen hours, twenty-seven minutes.

The news of the adventure spead like wildfire and the two men were received as heroes in London. For their accomplishment, they were presented with Lord Northcliffe's Daily Mail prize of £10,000 by Winston Churchill, who was then Britain's Secretary of State. A few days later, both men were knighted at Buckingham Palace by King George V, for recognition of their pioneering achievment.

Lees verder op http://www.aviation-history.com/airmen/alcock.htm
Zie ook http://en.citizendium.org/wiki/Human_flight,_history_(1919-1938)
_________________

"Omdat ik alles beter weet is het mijn plicht om betweters te minachten."
Marcel Wauters, Vlaams schrijver en kunstenaar 1921-2005
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
Percy Toplis



Geregistreerd op: 9-5-2009
Berichten: 15143
Woonplaats: Suindrecht

BerichtGeplaatst: 13 Jun 2010 20:48    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

14 June 1920, Commons Sitting

S.S. "BRUSSELS."


HC Deb 14 June 1920 vol 130 cc888-9 888

Sir J. BUTCHER asked the Prime Minister whether he is aware that the late Captain Fryatt's ship, the "Brussels," is advertised for sale at the Baltic Exchange on the 23rd instant, and that such a disposal of a ship associated with such historical memories would cause profound regret to large numbers of the officers and men of our mercantile marine; and whether he will cancel the proposed sale and utilise the ship as a training ship, or otherwise preserve it?

Colonel WILSON I have been asked to reply. The "Brussels" has been stripped of all her fittings, and is so damaged that there is nothing remaining on board of any general interest. I fully realise that the whole nation shares in admiration of the gallant conduct of Captain Fryatt whose name is associated with this ship, but if all the British steamers on which heroic actions took place were to be retained as exhibition ships, a very large proportion of the British mercantile marine would be laid idle. The ship has no value for exhibition purposes, nor would she be suitable as a training ship The Government have no need of her and if private purchasers can see their way to make efficient use of her, it is felt that this is the most satisfactory solution of the problem. Otherwise she must remain a constant charge. The Curator of the War Museum has been invited to inspect the ship to see if there is anything of historical national interest which could be placed in the National War Museum as a permanent record of the services of this very gallant officer of the British Mercantile Marine.

Sir J. BUTCHER Would the hon. Gentleman bear in mind that this ship was given back by the Belgian Government to us?

http://hansard.millbanksystems.com/commons/1920/jun/14/ss-brussels
_________________

"Omdat ik alles beter weet is het mijn plicht om betweters te minachten."
Marcel Wauters, Vlaams schrijver en kunstenaar 1921-2005
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
Percy Toplis



Geregistreerd op: 9-5-2009
Berichten: 15143
Woonplaats: Suindrecht

BerichtGeplaatst: 13 Jun 2010 21:02    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Ams Joannes Baptist

Landbouwer, geboren op vrijdag 8 november 1895 te Boom (soldaat 2 kl. OV 1914/11e linie), woonachtig te Schelle en te Merksplas, overleden op maandag 14 juni 1915 te Stuivekenskerke (Oud-Stuivekenskerke).

Lees het verhaal op http://degrooteoorlog.skynetblogs.be/tag/1/Ams
_________________

"Omdat ik alles beter weet is het mijn plicht om betweters te minachten."
Marcel Wauters, Vlaams schrijver en kunstenaar 1921-2005
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
Percy Toplis



Geregistreerd op: 9-5-2009
Berichten: 15143
Woonplaats: Suindrecht

BerichtGeplaatst: 13 Jun 2010 21:07    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Der Weltkrieg am 14. Juni 1915

Der deutsche Heeresbericht:

Siegreicher Sturmangriff der Armee Mackensen - 16000 Russen gefangen

Großes Hauptquartier, 14. Juni.

Westlicher Kriegsschauplatz: Auf der Front zwischen Liévin und Arras erlitten die Franzosen eine schwere Niederlage. Nachdem im Verlaufe des Tages mehrmals die zum Vorgehen bereitgestellten feindlichen Sturmkolonnen durch unser Artilleriefeuer vertrieben waren, setzten gegen Abend zwei starke feindliche Angriffe in dichten Linien gegen unsere Stellungen beiderseits der Lorettohöhe sowie auf der Front Neuville - Roclincourt ein. Der Gegner wurde überall unter schweren Verlusten zurückgeworfen. Sämtliche Stellungen sind voll in unserem Besitz geblieben.
Schwächere Angriffe des Feindes am Yserkanal wurden abgeschlagen. Südöstlich Hebuterne haben die Infanteriegefechte zu keinem nennenswerten Ergebnis geführt. Vorstöße gegen die von uns eroberten Stellungen in der Champagne wurden im Keime erstickt.

Östlicher Kriegsschauplatz: In der Nähe von Kuzowimia nordwestlich Szawle wurden einige feindliche Stellungen genommen und dabei drei Offiziere und 300 Mann zu Gefangenen gemacht.
Südöstlich der Straße Mariampol-Kowno erstürmten unsere Truppen die vorderste russische Linie, zwei Offiziere, 313 Mann wurden gefangengenommen.

Südöstlicher Kriegsschauplatz: Die Armee des Generalobersten v. Mackensen ist in einer Breite von 70 Kilometer aus ihren Stellungen zwischen Czerniawa (nordwestlich Mosciska) und Sieniawa zum Angriff vorgegangen. Die feindlichen Stellungen sind auf der ganzen Front gestürmt, 16000 Gefangene fielen gestern in unsere Hand.
Auch die Angriffe der Truppen des Generals von der Marwitz und des Generals v. Linsingen machten Fortschritte.

Oberste Heeresleitung. 1)

Der österreichisch-ungarische Heeresbericht:
Die Russen bei Mosziska im Rückzuge
Wien, 14. Juni.

Amtlich wird verlautbart:

Russischer Kriegsschauplatz: Die verbündeten Armeen in Mittelgalizien griffen gestern erneut an. Die russische Front östlich und südöstlich Jaroslau wurde nach heftigem Kampfe durchbrochen und der Feind unter den schwersten Verlusten zum Rückzuge gezwungen. Seit heute nacht sind die Russen auch bei und südöstlich Mosziska im Rückzuge. 16000 Russen wurden gestern gefangen.
Unterdessen dauern die Kämpfe südlich des Dnjestr fort. Bei Derzow südlich Mikolajow schlugen unsere Truppen vier starke Angriffe blutig ab. Der Feind räumte zuletzt fluchtartig das Gefechtsfeld. Nordwestlich Zurawno dringen die Verbündeten gegen Zydaczow vor und eroberten gestern nach schwerem Kampfe Rognzno. Auch nördlich Tlumacz schreitet der Angriff erfolgreich fort. Viele Gefangene, deren Zahl noch nicht feststeht, fielen dort in die Hände der Unsrigen. Nördlich Zaleszczyki griffen die Russen nach 11 Uhr nachts in einer drei Kilometer breiten Front vier Glieder tief an. Unter großen Verlusten brach dieser Massenvorstoß im Feuer unserer Truppen zusammen.

Italienischer Kriegsschauplatz: In dem Kampfe bei Plava am 12. Juni ließ der Feind, wie nun festgestellt wurde, über 1000 Tote und sehr viele Verwundete vor unseren Stellungen liegen. Gestern spät abends wiesen unsere Truppen einen abermaligen Angriff gleich allen früheren ab. Die Italiener vermochten somit an der Isonzofront nirgends durchzudringen. Im Kärntner und Tiroler Grenzgebiet hat sich nichts Wesentliches ereignet.

Balkankriegsschauplatz: Südlich Avdovac wies eine unserer Feldwachen den Angriff von zirka 200 Montenegrinern nach kurzem Kampfe ab. Sonst ist die Lage im Südosten unverändert

Der Stellvertreter des Chefs des Generalstabes.
v. Hoefer, Feldmarschalleutnant.

http://www.stahlgewitter.com/15_06_14.htm
_________________

"Omdat ik alles beter weet is het mijn plicht om betweters te minachten."
Marcel Wauters, Vlaams schrijver en kunstenaar 1921-2005
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
Percy Toplis



Geregistreerd op: 9-5-2009
Berichten: 15143
Woonplaats: Suindrecht

BerichtGeplaatst: 13 Jun 2010 21:31    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Walthère Joseph-Charles Dewé

Walthère Joseph-Charles Dewé werd op 16 juli 1880 geboren te Luik. Hij studeerde in 1904 af aan de universiteit van Luik als burgerlijk mijningenieur en een jaar later als electrisch ingenieur aan het Montefiore Instituut. Dewé zal zijn ganse beroepscarrière werkzaam blijven aan de R.T.T. (Regie voor Telefonie en Telegrafie), een voorloper van het huidige Belgacom. In 1913, aan de vooravond van de Eerste Wereldoorlog, is hij Ingenieur 1ste klas aan de R.T.T.,
hoofdingenieur dus.

Dewé was een typische Luikenaar van de vuurstede: flamboyant, innemend en bijzonder intelligent. Met zijn diepdoordringende blauwe ogen, kort geknipte en korte zwarte baard bleek Dewé een groot organisator, maar hij kon tegelijk ook een streng en autoritair leider zijn. Die kwaliteiten zullen niet enkel zijn bedrijf ten goede komen maar vooral tot uiting komen tijdens beide wereldoorlogen.

Op het einde van 1914 heeft een neef van Dewé, Dieudonné Lambrecht, een inlichtingendienst opgezet in opdracht van de geallieerden. Lambrecht wordt op 25 februari 1916 door de Duitsers gearresteerd en stierf op 18 april '16 te Chartreuse voor het vuurpeloton. Dewé besluit om samen met zijn vriend, Herman Chauvin, om de fakkel over te nemen van Lambrecht.

Samen bouwen zij in opdracht van de Britse S.I.S. het inlichtingennetwerk La Dame Blanche uit dat operationeel zal blijven tot aan het einde van de Eerste Wereldoorlog in november 1918. Het duo wordt ook nog vervoegd door de jezuiet Pater Desonay (º1886) die echter op 14 juni 1917 wordt opgepakt en de gevangenis van Holzminden zal uitzitten tot het einde van de oorlog.

Andere medewerkers dienen zich aan zoals bv Thérèse de Radiguès de Chennevière en Anatole Gobeaux, die ook later in Clarence tijdens de Tweede Wereldoorlog opnieuw actief zullen worden wanneer ons land opnieuw door de Duitsers wordt aangevallen en bezet.

De organisatorische aanpak van Dewé is fenomenaal. Dewé bouwt een stevig hiérachisch gestructureerde organisatie uit die het ganse land bestrijkt en telt op haar hoogtepunt 1.084 agenten die elk zorgvuldig werden gescreend. Dewé
speelde alle gegevens door naar het War Office van de S.I.S. dat in Nederland een kantoor openhield. Nederland herbergde bij het uitbreken honderdduizenden vluchtelingen afkomstig uit Vlaanderen en vanuit de rest van België en zal tijdens WOI niet bezet worden door de Duitsers. Met hun organisatie La Dame Blanche zijn Dewé en Chauvin de eerste mannen die een compleet inlichtingennetwerk op de sporen zetten in bezet gebied.

Londen is enorm onder de indruk van de prestataties van Dewé en zijn team. Maarschalk Sir Douglas Haig zal na de Wapenstilstand op 31 maart 1919 verklaren dat hij iedere ochtend een samenvatting onder ogen kreeg van de door La Dame Blanche bezorgde inlichtingen en dat hij er gebruik van maakte om zijn legeroperaties te coördineren. ["J'avais tous les matins devant mes yeux le résumé des données d'observation du corps. Avant même d'ouvrir mon courrier, je parcourais les 150 pages des trois rapports hebdomadaires de la Dame Blanche et je me servais constamment des renseignements qu'ils contenaient pour la conduite des opérations militaires."]

Dankzij de perfecte organisatie en militaire discipline kan Dewé het aantal slachtoffers binnen La Dame Blanche beperken tot drie. Een opmerkelijk feit! Na de oorlog neemt Dewé de draad van zijn gewone leven weer op en gaat opnieuw aan de slag bij de Regie voor Telefonie en Telegrafie.

Op 31 januari 1920 vind in de zaal van het Luikse Conservatorium, in de aanwezigheid van de provinciegoeverneur Gaston Grégoire en vele burgerlijke en militaire personaliteiten, een erehulde plaats voor Dewé en zijn team van La Dame Blanche.

De Engelse koning George de Vijfde is er speciaal voor naar België afgereisd om Dewé één van de hoogste onderscheidingen uit te reiken: Commandant in de Orde van het Britse Rijk! Alle medewerkers van La Dame Blanche worden onderscheiden en ontvangen de Oorlogsmedaille (War Medal) van het Britse Rijk.

De Belgische bureaucratie, behoudens de promotie van Dewé in de rang van kapitein-commandant, is minder gul die dag. Het publiek gelooft haar ogen niet. Dewé krijgt van de Belgische staat slechts het ereteken van Ridder in de Leopoldsorde met gouden franjes, een onderscheiding die elke burger krijgt na 20 jaar overheidsdienst... in vredestijd!

http://www.verzet.org/index2.php?option=com_content&do_pdf=1&id=870
_________________

"Omdat ik alles beter weet is het mijn plicht om betweters te minachten."
Marcel Wauters, Vlaams schrijver en kunstenaar 1921-2005
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
Percy Toplis



Geregistreerd op: 9-5-2009
Berichten: 15143
Woonplaats: Suindrecht

BerichtGeplaatst: 13 Jun 2010 22:00    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Meierijsche Courant, Zaterdag 14 Juni 1919.

Valkenswaard.

- Gisteren morgen werden twee Duitsche geïnterneerden door de Marchaussees, alhier opgepikt en naar Venlo getransporteerd, om vandaar naar hun "Heimat" terug te keeren. Bovengenoemde waren het kamp van Beverloo ontvlucht.

- Naar wij vernemen zal binnen korten tijd bij de fa. Gijraths het werk hervat worden, daar de firma door middel van consent haar ganschen voorraad sigaren heeft kunnen exporteeren.

http://www.shgv.nl/KrantenArtikelen/19191.htm
_________________

"Omdat ik alles beter weet is het mijn plicht om betweters te minachten."
Marcel Wauters, Vlaams schrijver en kunstenaar 1921-2005
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
Yvonne
Admin


Geregistreerd op: 2-2-2005
Berichten: 45588

BerichtGeplaatst: 22 Jun 2011 13:11    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Eastern Front

Russians fall back towards Grodek line (Lemberg).

Political, etc.

Second reading of the Finance Bill.
http://www.firstworldwar.com/onthisday/1915_06_14.htm
_________________
Met hart en ziel
De enige echte

https://twitter.com/ForumWO1
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht Verstuur mail Bekijk de homepage
Percy Toplis



Geregistreerd op: 9-5-2009
Berichten: 15143
Woonplaats: Suindrecht

BerichtGeplaatst: 14 Jun 2018 7:14    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Dernancourt, France. 14 June 1918.

A set OF 180 gas projectors alongside the Albert-Amiens railway in front of the Casualty Clearing Station at Dernancourt. These projectors were electrically fired the same night immediately preceding an attack which was successful. The tins and rubbish scattered about serve for camouflage.

Foto! https://www.awm.gov.au/collection/E04897/
_________________

"Omdat ik alles beter weet is het mijn plicht om betweters te minachten."
Marcel Wauters, Vlaams schrijver en kunstenaar 1921-2005
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
Percy Toplis



Geregistreerd op: 9-5-2009
Berichten: 15143
Woonplaats: Suindrecht

BerichtGeplaatst: 14 Jun 2018 7:16    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Coquerel, France. 14 June 1918.

Group portrait of the 38th Battery of Australian Field Artillery, outside the Chateau. Identified, from front row, left to right: 5001 Battery Sergeant Major E. Hircoe (1); 30431 Acting Bombardier (A/Bdr) S. R. Cummings (2); 30776 Gunner (Gnr) N. L. Critten (3); 29668 Farrier Sergeant N. W. Jones (4); 2161 Sergeant (Sgt) H. J. Head (5); 3198 Gnr H. J. Povey (6); 3531 Corporal (Cpl) C. Howard (7); 1613 Gnr A. Henderson (8); 2571 Gnr Alfred Uriah Cobb (9); 1813 Gnr J. W. Edwards (10); Lieutenant (Lt) T. D. Spittel (11); Lt L. Brunton MC (12); Captain (Capt) G. W. Hall (13); Lt A. N. Liutott (14); 1691 Driver (Dvr) G. Rasmussen (15); 11125 Dvr J. Reynolds (16); 35628 Gnr Henry Pottinger Keatinge (17); 1704 Dvr A. Sheean (18); 4370 Shoeing Smith (S Sth) E. Euslow (19); 1290 Dvr A. D. McInnes (20); 346 Sgt E. T. Cornish (21); 3555 Dvr F. Woods (22); 15107 Gnr S. H. Duthie (23); 2596 Bombardier (Bdr) J. Alderton (24); 1407 Gnr E. O'Toole (25); 1102 Sgt O. E. Ibbotsen (26); 30279 Sgt J. Sharp (27); 1955 Sgt C. H. Briggs (28); 2039 Cpl J. J. Kemp (29); 339 Battery Quartermaster Sergeant W. C. Carter (30); 197 Dvr J. E. Cochrane (31); 3702 Dvr R. Blackburn (32); 4908 Gnr J. T. Williams (33); 2499 Gnr E. Roberts (34); 4198 Gnr E. Slingo (35); 1929 Dvr S. Windsor (36); 3174 Dvr M. L. Smith (37); 1556 Dvr C. Hughes (38); 33274 Gnr Bertie Henry Blashki (39); 1737 Dvr H. E. Keene (40); 33844 Dvr K. C. Richardson (41); 4639 Cpl C. C. Wood (42); 1439 Dvr W. H. Dawes (43); 37613 Gnr E. W. Plumridge (44); 30277 Gnr R. S. Steele (45); 17305 Gnr G. C. King (46); 32044 Gnr W. Jarvis (47); 1822 Bdr H. L. Rogers (48); 1753 Bdr F. W. Hobbs (49); 31149 Dvr J. A. Tims (50); 29890 Dvr S. W. Corben (51); 37852 Gnr R. A. Chapple (52); 35067 Gnr S. Tallent (53); 2910 Dvr C. Summons (53A); 30262 Gnr R. J. Gartrell (54); 27827 Gnr J. A. Sinclair (55); 31594 Gnr G. W. Kreuger (56); 35667 Gnr G. Slingsby (57); 1540 Gnr A. Durham (58); 1423 Dvr A. N. Bartholomew (59); 31678 Dvr F. Watling (60); 1948 Dvr A. Dick (61); 399 Dvr G. H. A. Hill (62); 3875 Dvr H. Cox (63); 9986 Dvr Raymond John Spargo (64); 15155 Dvr F. Mansfield (65); 33406 Dvr J. C. J. Rice (66); 2071 Bdr D. Jennings (67); 2100 Dvr A. O. Martens (68); 1474 Gnr G. R. Davies (69); 4601 Gnr H. R. Roberts (70); 28342 Dvr J. L. Daley (71); 2929 Dvr F. Vicary (72); 22514 Dvr G. Grose (73); 1732 Dvr W. D. Goodman (74); 34080 Dvr A. S. Bailey (75); 15681 Bdr W. J. Prendergest (76); 14027 Gnr E. J. Markham (77); 1266 Gnr A. Paul (78); 4196 Dvr H. Green (79); 28352 Gnr J. H. Spencer (80); 37923 Gnr F. W. Thompson (81); 32925 Dvr R. C. Moxham (82); 1712 Dvr A. A. Kelly (83); 33060 Dvr T. W. G. Whitney (84); 1093 Dvr C. N. Gibson (85); 1788 Gnr W. W. Rice (86); 1819 Cpl C. J. Moynihan MM (87); 3116 Dvr A. K. Jones (88); 2161 Dvr W. C. Smurthwaite? (89); 31472 Gnr W. Hutchinson (90); 27263 Gnr H. C. McPherson (91); 30182 Dvr G. A. Taylor (92); 34081 Gnr R. M. Bailey (93); 2169 Dvr G. Thomas (94); 30278 Gnr E. M. Steele (95); 30170 Gnr G. L. Biddell (96); 1475 Bdr W. H. Wilkinson (97); 27320 Gnr Marcus Claude DeChateaubourg (98); 1858 Dvr Thomas James Elliott (99); 29590 Dvr S. E. Williams (100); 2037 Bdr H. P. Higgins (101); 1406 Dvr K. Oakes (102); 1388 Bdr R. L. Corbett (103); 33827 Gnr E. Wall (104); 15692 A/Bdr E. J. Hayward (105); 4663 Gnr P. Salter (106); 1669 Dvr E. R. Small (107); 2001 Gnr E. L. Deacon (108); omitted (109); 2098 S Sth A. Stewart (110); 32373 Dvr C. E. Peters (111); 1268 Gnr H. R. Goodwin (112); 1758 Gnr M. D. Justice MM (113); 1715 Bdr J. M. O'Brien MM (114); 2638 Dvr C. McPherson (115); 4332 Dvr W. H. Johnson (116); 15108 Gnr W. J. Duthie (117); 3962 Gnr G. S. Dodds (118); 4364 Dvr A. V. Collins (119); 745 Gnr A. E. Keene (120); 1797 Gnr A. J. Potts (121); 34088 Gnr W. J. Donovan (122); 1605 Dvr James Roy Dunn (123); 2059 Dvr N. Hurst (124); 4464 Dvr D. Carroll (125); 37463 Gnr E. C. Green (126); ?39946 (34946) Gnr R. H. Bant (127); 38057 Gnr G. D. Rowley (128); 34809 Dvr E. F. Richardson (129); 35012 Gnr H. Law (130); 30259 Gnr J. G. Booth (131); 38912 Dvr R. L. Moxham (132).

Foto... https://www.awm.gov.au/collection/C394277
_________________

"Omdat ik alles beter weet is het mijn plicht om betweters te minachten."
Marcel Wauters, Vlaams schrijver en kunstenaar 1921-2005
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
Percy Toplis



Geregistreerd op: 9-5-2009
Berichten: 15143
Woonplaats: Suindrecht

BerichtGeplaatst: 14 Jun 2018 7:18    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Worcestershire - 14 June 1918

Home Front:

At the City Police Court today, there were 18 charges of alleged false pretences on the part of the employees at Messrs. Heenan and Froude, Ltd. James Farmer (50), shop clerk and storekeeper, 11, Sebright Avenue, was charged with nine summonses with false pretences of sums ranging from 2s. 10d. to 15s.; the other defendants were charged with aiding and abetting…Mr. Dobbs, prosecuting, said that the proceedings were brought as a deterrent to the other workmen doing important work there.

Second-Lieut. James Francis Davies, Worcestershires, son of Mrs. Davies, King Street, Dudley, who joined the Army in 1912, was recently promoted to his present rank from Com.-Sergt.-Major. His decorations include the D.C.M., the Mons Star, and four chevrons. He was present at all the engagements which helped to make the Worcestershires famous.

http://www.ww1worcestershire.co.uk/key-dates/1918/06/18-charges-of-alleged-false-pretences/
_________________

"Omdat ik alles beter weet is het mijn plicht om betweters te minachten."
Marcel Wauters, Vlaams schrijver en kunstenaar 1921-2005
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
Percy Toplis



Geregistreerd op: 9-5-2009
Berichten: 15143
Woonplaats: Suindrecht

BerichtGeplaatst: 14 Jun 2018 7:19    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Lowell in World War One: June 10, 1918 to June 14, 1918

This is the 58th installment of my Lowell in World War One series which commemorates the centennial of the entry of the United States into World War One. Here are the headlines from one hundred years ago

June 14, 1918Friday – UBoats renew attacks off coast. Hatest Hun attempt to break French lines fails after five days of bitter fighting. Sectors where the Americans are fighting are heavily bombarded. Private Myles F. Ralls of 111 Grand Street was severely wounded in action in France on June 7 according to a telegram received by his parents. Street parade this evening will feature Flag Day observance. The parade will begin at 7pm sharp at Market Street near Dutton.

http://richardhowe.com/2018/06/13/lowell-in-world-war-one-june-10-1918-to-june-14-1918/
_________________

"Omdat ik alles beter weet is het mijn plicht om betweters te minachten."
Marcel Wauters, Vlaams schrijver en kunstenaar 1921-2005
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
Percy Toplis



Geregistreerd op: 9-5-2009
Berichten: 15143
Woonplaats: Suindrecht

BerichtGeplaatst: 14 Jun 2018 7:21    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

THE ZUIDERZEE ACT AND THE ZUIDERZEE WORKS

The piece of legislation paving the way to closing off and draining the Zuiderzee (the Zuiderzee Act) passed into law on 14 June 1918. This starting shot heralded the beginning of the Zuiderzee Works.

The bill was submitted to the Lower House of Parliament by engineer Cornelis Lely, Minister of Water Management, on 9 September 1916. The Zuiderzee Act was endorsed by the Lower House on 21 March 1918. The Upper House approved the act on 13 June and the Zuiderzee Act entered the Statute Books on 14 June 1918, the day it officially became law. The14th of June will be at the core of the 2018 celebrations.

The Zuiderzee Act is known as a framework act, which means no specifics about what will happen, nor when, are given. What the act does set out however is that the Zuiderzee will indeed be closed off and the costs borne by the government. The closing off will be achieved by building a dike ‘running from the coast of Noord-Holland through the Amstel channel to the island of Wieringen and from this island to the Frisian coast at Piaam’. Sections of the sealed off Zuiderzee are to be drained. The government was to decide in due course what sections and in which order the various areas would be pumped out.

The principal stimulation for agreeing the act were that it would create far greater security against floods, create a freshwater basin and deliver much needed new agricultural land. The Zuiderzee Act consists of a number of planned Zuiderzee Works projects drawn from Lely's plan. The 'Dienst der Zuiderzeewerken' and the 'Rijksdienst voor de IJsselmeerpolders' respectively were responsible for the waterworks and for laying out the new land in the polders.

https://www.100jaarzuiderzeewet.com/verhalen/de-zuiderzeewet-en-de-zuiderzeewerken?lang=en
_________________

"Omdat ik alles beter weet is het mijn plicht om betweters te minachten."
Marcel Wauters, Vlaams schrijver en kunstenaar 1921-2005
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
Percy Toplis



Geregistreerd op: 9-5-2009
Berichten: 15143
Woonplaats: Suindrecht

BerichtGeplaatst: 14 Jun 2018 7:22    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Selfridge Field, Michigan - 14 June 1918.

Taken from an altitude of 3,500 feet.

Foto... https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:Selfridge_Field_-_14_June_1918.jpg
_________________

"Omdat ik alles beter weet is het mijn plicht om betweters te minachten."
Marcel Wauters, Vlaams schrijver en kunstenaar 1921-2005
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
Percy Toplis



Geregistreerd op: 9-5-2009
Berichten: 15143
Woonplaats: Suindrecht

BerichtGeplaatst: 14 Jun 2018 8:10    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

14 juni 1917 | Nieuwsbericht | Oorlog in Alveringem

Joseph Cologne is op 7 november 1894 geboren in het Brabantse dorp Hakendover. De ongehuwde zoon van Rembertus Carolus en Maria Virginia Verburgt treedt als oorlogsvrijwilliger in dienst van het Belgisch leger.

Op 24 juni 1917 wordt hij om drie uur 's nachts in de sector Diksmuide gedood door een geweerkogel in het hoofd en overgebracht naar het militair dodenhuis van Alveringem.

Het slachtoffer wordt op 15 juni 1917 begraven op de Belgische militaire begraafplaats van Oeren, grafnummer 95.

http://www.oorlogserfgoedalveringem.be/nl/14-juni-1917
_________________

"Omdat ik alles beter weet is het mijn plicht om betweters te minachten."
Marcel Wauters, Vlaams schrijver en kunstenaar 1921-2005
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
Percy Toplis



Geregistreerd op: 9-5-2009
Berichten: 15143
Woonplaats: Suindrecht

BerichtGeplaatst: 14 Jun 2018 8:15    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Mijnenslag bij Mesen

De Mijnenslag bij Mesen was een Britse aanval met mijnen die duurde van 7 juni tot 14 juni 1917.

Lees verder op http://www.forumeerstewereldoorlog.nl/wiki/index.php/Mijnenslag_bij_Mesen
Zie ook http://www.wo1.be/nl/geschiedenis/gastbijdragen/personen/ooggetuigeverslag-mijnenslag-7-juni-1917-kolonel-rowland-feilding
Zie ook https://historiek.net/totale-oorlog-in-vlaanderen/69791/
Zie ook http://www.focus-wtv.be/nieuws/zero-hour-herdenkt-mijnenslag-wijtschate-en-mesen
_________________

"Omdat ik alles beter weet is het mijn plicht om betweters te minachten."
Marcel Wauters, Vlaams schrijver en kunstenaar 1921-2005


Laatst aangepast door Percy Toplis op 14 Jun 2018 8:21, in totaal 1 keer bewerkt
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
Percy Toplis



Geregistreerd op: 9-5-2009
Berichten: 15143
Woonplaats: Suindrecht

BerichtGeplaatst: 14 Jun 2018 8:20    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Dagboek Raphaël Waterschoot 1915 & 1917

14 juni 1915 maandag - Ik ga om een paspoort om naar Antwerpen te gaan .'t Kost mij 3,00fr. en n'en heelen dag loopen. Eerst ne keer of drie naar 't policicommisariaat loopen en vervolgens n'en ganschen namiddag op het passbureau. Militairen spelen daar den baas!
Het "Handelsblad" van Antwerpen dat we tegenwoordig alle dagen gesmokkeld krijgen, is voor 14 dagen door de Duitschers gestraft. Wij krijgen dus enkel erg gecensureerd nieuws van Gent uit de dagbladen "Het Volk" en de "Gentenaar".
't Wonderste in die couranten is dat de Duitschers altijd winnen en nooit verliezen!

14 juni 1917 donderdag - Nieuwe aardappelen kosten 1,50fr: de kgr. - erwten 1,10fr: de kgr - kersen 1,00 fr: de kgr.

http://www.oorlogsdagboek.org/1915%20oorlogsdagboek%201915/scannen0160sma.htm & http://www.oorlogsdagboek.org/1917%20oorlogsdagboek%201917/scannen0111.htm
_________________

"Omdat ik alles beter weet is het mijn plicht om betweters te minachten."
Marcel Wauters, Vlaams schrijver en kunstenaar 1921-2005


Laatst aangepast door Percy Toplis op 14 Jun 2018 8:39, in totaal 1 keer bewerkt
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
Percy Toplis



Geregistreerd op: 9-5-2009
Berichten: 15143
Woonplaats: Suindrecht

BerichtGeplaatst: 14 Jun 2018 8:34    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Kroniek van de 20ste eeuw [tot en met 1940]

14 juni 1916 - De Conventie van de Democratische Partij te St. Louis nomineert het presidentiële koppel Wilson- Marshall voor de presidentsverkiezingen.

Conventies in Verenigde Staten
CHICAGO, 10 juni- Op de Conventie van de Republikeinse partij is gebleken dat de splitsing van 1912 nog van ernstige nawerking te lijden heeft: voor geen prijs wilde men Roosevelt terug, men zocht iemand die met het conflict van toen niets te maken heeft, een redelijk liberaal imago heeft, en ook de stemmen van Amerikanen van Duitse oorsprong kan trekken.
In de derde stemronde is uiteindelijk Charles Evans Hughes gekozen, een rechter van het Hooggerechtshof, met Charles Fairbanks als kandidaat voor het vice-presidentschap.
De nieuwe Progressieve partij, die met haar Conventie had gewacht tot die van de Republikeinen was gehouden, hopend dat de Grand Old Party misschien toch nog Roosevelt zou nomineren, zou een bittere teleurstelling te verwerken krijgen. Hoewel de partij onmiddellijk bij het begin van de Conventie weer Roosevelt kandidaat stelt, met John Parker als ‘running mate’, laat Roosevelt, die geen zin heeft in een herhaling van de smadelijke nederlaag van 1912, per brief weten dat hij de benoeming niet zal aanvaarden en de Republikeinse kandidaat Hughes zal steunen. De Conventie besluit uiteindelijk dat voorbeeld te volgen en tekent daarmee het definitieve doodvonnis van de Progressieve partij.
Op 14 juni wordt president Wilson op de Conventie van de Democratische partij in St. Louis met slechts één stem tegen opnieuw kandidaat gesteld voor het presidentschap. Kandidaat voor het vice-presidentschap is ook de zittende vice-president Thomas Marshall.

http://www.dbnl.org/tekst/bouw029kron01_01/bouw029kron01_01_0821.php#a821 via http://www.dbnl.org/tekst/bouw029kron01_01/bouw029kron01_01_0820.php
_________________

"Omdat ik alles beter weet is het mijn plicht om betweters te minachten."
Marcel Wauters, Vlaams schrijver en kunstenaar 1921-2005
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
Percy Toplis



Geregistreerd op: 9-5-2009
Berichten: 15143
Woonplaats: Suindrecht

BerichtGeplaatst: 14 Jun 2018 8:37    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Krant van Blankenberge | Oorlogskroniek | Juni 1916

14 juni 1916 - De Stadtkommandant laat afkondigen dat de lokale cafés voortaan pas vanaf 11u30 in de voormiddag mogen openen.

Bron: SAB, Uitkerke, verordeningen, 14 juni 1916

http://www.krantvanblankenberge.be/oorlog/1916juni.html
_________________

"Omdat ik alles beter weet is het mijn plicht om betweters te minachten."
Marcel Wauters, Vlaams schrijver en kunstenaar 1921-2005
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
Percy Toplis



Geregistreerd op: 9-5-2009
Berichten: 15143
Woonplaats: Suindrecht

BerichtGeplaatst: 14 Jun 2018 8:51    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Luitenant Jacobus Winters - 10e linieregiment - Dagboeken getrokken uit den oorlog van 1914

Zondag 13 - maandag 14 juni 1915
Den 13en lagen we in piket in den loopgracht voor het routehuisje van Oud-Stuivekenskerke. Tegen
den avond meldde men ons dat onze compagnie het pachthof " Den Toren" moest aanvallen. Dit
pachthof is fel versterkt door de Duitschers die er sinds den winter in standhouden. De zakken laten
we in de loopgrachten achter. Tegen tien uren 's avonds vooruit. We rusten even aan de groote
wacht en dan verder. We verzamelen achter eenen abri der uiterste voorposten. Dan beginnen onze
batterijen Den Toren te bombardeeren gedurende 10 minuten. Honderde obussen fluiten over ons
hoofd om met razend geweld in en rond het pachthof op 200 meters vóór ons te ontploffen. Eenige
obussen vallen te kort en maken 3 of 4 gekwetsten in onze rangen. Dan tusschenpoos van 15
minuten en dan nieuw bombardement heviger nog. Ik lach want dat muziek staat me aan en
nochtans, 't is om razend zot te worden dat akelig gefluit over ons. Dan verlegt de artellerie haar
geschut om de toegangswegen tot het pachthof onder schot te houden. 't Is het signaal. We kruipen
over de boyau's (verbindingsloopgraaf) en op den buik vooruit door het hooge gras. De pelotons
kruipen 't een nevens 't ander op een front van 200 meters. Ik blijf achter een boyau toezien want ik
ben délégué der Cie. Men zou zeggen dat al de Duitschers dood gebleven zijn in 't pachthof want ze
schieten niet alhoewel de Cie nog enkel op 70 meters van de hoef is. Het 1e peloton geraakt aan een
duitschen vooruit geschoven tranchée: twee duitschers loopen weg, de eene krijgt een bajonetsteek
in den nek en valt. De andere vlucht door een boyau. Ze kruipen over den tranchée en de uiterste
linkerman van 't 1e peloton komt bij een dikken boom waar een schildwacht staat. Hij wordt
doorstoken en weer vooruit. Het 1e pel. houdt stil aan eene prikkeldraadversperring die ze
overknippen. Op 30 meters van 't pachthof rust het 1e peloton. Het 2e peloton komt achterna.
Intusschen is 't 3e pel. langs den linkerzijkant vooruit gedrongen in de flank. Zij komen op hoogte van
't 1e pel. en rusten. Twee mannen van 't 3e pel. dringen alleen vooruit op patrouille. Ze komen voor
eene nieuwe hinderpaal van prikkeldraad. Eene springt erover, geen schaar hebbende om ze over te
knippen. De andere blijft op wacht. De 1e sluipt vooruit, komt aan de hoeve en ziet de muil eene
machiengeweer door den loopgracht uitsteken. Hij grijpt de muil ervan vast en tracht ze naar zich toe
te trekken; doch 't lukt niet en langzaam wijkt hij. Juist is hij terug over den draad als 2 mitrailleuzen
beginnen te werken en hem dood vóór zijns makkers voeten uitstrekken.
4 Mitrailleuzen en vele geweren werken nu, en op eenige minuten verliezen we tientallen van
mannen. 't Is onmogelijk vooruit te gaan. Ook ga ik renfort (versterking) vragen bij den majoor. Ik
moet lang achter hem zoeken en vind hem niet, doch zijn hulpluitenant stuurt me terug bij mijn
commandant na hulp beloofd te hebben. Op den buik kruip ik door gras en slijk en breng eindelijk het
nieuws bij de commandant, ondanks de honderden ballen die rond mij fluiten. Dan keer ik
achterwaarts om nieuwe orders af te wachten, doch 't duurt me te lang eer de renfort komt, en
daarbij, het begint reeds klaar te worden. Ik ga zien naar de renfort, doch verneem dat het te klaar
wordt om de onderneming voort te zetten. Ook moet ik order dragen aan de Cie zich terug te
trekken . Voorzichtig kruipende geraak ik bij den Commandant die op 70 meters van het pachthof
met de mannen ligt. Reeds waren ze bezig een loopgracht te graven om er den ganschen dag zonder
eten en drinken in te blijven, om dan 's avonds den aanval te vernieuwen. Ook waren ze blijde om
het nieuws van den aftocht. Twee en twee en tien meters van elkander, kwamen ze onder een
nieuwen kogelregen terug. 't Was gansch klaar eer de laatste terug achter de voorposten waren. We
verzamelden om aan den ijzerenweg en dan naar Eggewaertskapelle terug om ons te reinigen en te
slapen.
's Anderendags wierd de optelling gedaan. Helaas, 47 man van rond de 200 antwoordden niet. We
hadden op 't minst 7 à 8 dooden, en de rest gekwetst. 2 der laatsten stierven na 4 dagen lijden.
Beiden waren vertrouwde vrienden van me. 't Zijn korporaal Aerts, postbeambte te Hasselt en
Warsage van Luik, student in de medicijnen. Aerts zong vaderlandsche liederen terwijl ze hem
wegdroegen. En hij zag toch zoveel af, de arme goede jongen, gansch de rechterzijde open en het
bekken gebroken. Een artikel, eenige dagen later in de "Indépendance Belge" verschenen, huldigde
hem als held. En 't was er een ook, steeds op de gevaarlijkste plaats en de makkers door zijn gullen
lach en geestigen praat opwekkend.
's Anderdaags voor 8 dagen naar De Panne.

Leuk PDF'je! http://www.geraaktdoordeoorlog.eu/wp-content/uploads/2014/07/JacobusWinters.pdf
_________________

"Omdat ik alles beter weet is het mijn plicht om betweters te minachten."
Marcel Wauters, Vlaams schrijver en kunstenaar 1921-2005
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
Percy Toplis



Geregistreerd op: 9-5-2009
Berichten: 15143
Woonplaats: Suindrecht

BerichtGeplaatst: 14 Jun 2018 8:55    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

"Exilium - Children of the little corner never conquered"

... OVER HET ZENDEN VAN [BELGISCHE] KINDEREN NAAR PARIJSE SCHOOLKOLONIES...

Telegrammen van 14 juni 1915:
- Grignon is klaar: secretaris VAN HOOF gaat morgenvoormiddag langs om alle schikkingen te treffen voor het avondeten voor 100 kinderen, woensdagmorgen worden nog 150 kinderen overgebracht
- Fontenay-aux-Roses is eveneens klaar om 70 meisjes te installeren
- in Balainvilliers en Chevilly is iedereen tevreden.

https://oorlogskantschool.wordpress.com/empain-brunet/
_________________

"Omdat ik alles beter weet is het mijn plicht om betweters te minachten."
Marcel Wauters, Vlaams schrijver en kunstenaar 1921-2005
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
Percy Toplis



Geregistreerd op: 9-5-2009
Berichten: 15143
Woonplaats: Suindrecht

BerichtGeplaatst: 14 Jun 2018 9:02    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Mechelen afgesloten van de buitenwereld

In juni 1915 sloot de Duitse bezetter Mechelen bijna 2 weken af van de buitenwereld. De stad werd volledig geïsoleerd. En dat veroorzaakte in de buitenwereld grote onrust.

2 juni 1915. Op bevel van Moritz von Bissing, Generaal-gouverneur van het bezette België, wordt het Mechelse Pass-Amt gesloten. Niemand mag Mechelen in of uit.

Burgers kunnen geen reispassen meer krijgen en in een straal van een tiental kilometer rond de stad – van de Verbrande Brug tot Duffel – wordt alle verkeer met personen of landbouwvoertuigen, fietsen, auto’s, trams, of per schip, onvoorwaardelijk verboden.

Tramrails worden aan alle uiteinden van de perimeter opgebroken, zodat er geen enkele tram Mechelen in of uit kon. Mechelen wordt van de buitenwereld geïsoleerd.

De reden van deze drastische en eerder ongewone strafmaatregel ligt bij de mislukte heropening van de Centrale Werkplaats van de Belgische Spoorwegen, in de volksmond gekend als ’t Arsenaal.

Voor de Duitse oorlogseconomie was die heropening van groot belang. Sinds het vastlopen van het Belgische front in de Westhoek deden de Duitsers er alles aan om het zwaar beschadigde spoornet in het bezette België te herstellen.

Mechelen speelde daarbij een belangrijke rol. Duitse troepen en materieel werden vanuit het Ruhrgebied over Luik en Leuven tot Mechelen gebracht, vanwaar ze via Gent en Brugge richting front spoorden.

In Mechelen moesten treinen worden samengesteld, hersteld, en onderhouden. Maar dat vraagt personeel. Veel personeel.

De stad Mechelen was in de zomer van 1914 voorzienend genoeg om te weten dat mocht de stad door de Duitsers worden bezet, het Arsenaal een belangrijke schakel zou kunnen worden voor de organisatie van het Duitse leger in België.

De Centrale Werkplaats sloot haar deuren op 17 augustus 1914, nadat het wekenlang zoveel mogelijk treinen had klaargemaakt voor troepen- en materiaalvervoer.

Nadien zette de stad alle Mechelse Arsenaalarbeiders die niet ingelijfd waren in het Belgische leger gratis over naar het Verenigd Koninkrijk. Op die manier zouden zij later – bij een eventuele bezetting – niet kunnen worden opgevorderd om in dienst van de Duitsers weer aan de slag te gaan in het Arsenaal.

Die maatregel miste zijn effect niet. Tegen de tijd dat de Duitsers hun zaken op orde hadden om het Arsenaal weer te heropenen, was er in de verre omgeving geen Arsenaalarbeider meer te bekennen.

Op 8 mei 1915 wordt Mechels burgemeester Charles Dessain ontboden bij Kreischef von Wengersky en Zivilkommissar von Abel om te vergaderen over de heropening van het Arsenaal.

De Duitse gezagsdragers eisen een lijst van vierhonderd voormalige Arsenaalmannen, met naam, adres, leeftijd en familieomstandigheden.

Dessain weigert op de vraag in te gaan, omdat ze indruist tegen de Convensties van Den Haag, waar werd beslist dat burgers uit bezet gebied door de bezetter niet mogen worden ingeschakeld in de oorlogsindustrie.

Er wordt druk uitgeoefend op Dessain en uiteindelijk wordt er een compromis bereikt: de stad zal een oproep uithangen, maar levert geen lijst in bij de Duitsers.

Voormalige Arsenaalarbeiders die zich geroepen voelen, mogen zich melden bij de Centrale Werkplaats, officieel om rijtuigen klaar te maken voor het toenemende personenvervoer in België.

De oproep bleef quasi zonder gevolg en wanneer ook een verhoogd loon niet voldoende arbeidskrachten aanbrengt, wordt Dessain nogmaals ontboden. Hij wordt verplicht om een lijst op te maken, zodat de Duitsers zelf op zoek kunnen gaan naar de voormalige werklieden.

Gekrenkt in zijn eer en balancerend op de dunne lijn tussen patriottisme en arrogantie, bezorgt Dessain de Duitsers de gegevens van vierhonderd mannen waarvan de burgemeester weet dat ze dood, gehandicapt of niet in de stad aanwezig zijn.

De Duitsers zijn woedend en schakelen freiherr von Bissing, hoofd van het bezette België en rechtstreeks dienend onder keizer Wilhelm II, in. Het wordt een nationale zaak.

Von Bissing wil een snelle oplossing. Hij dreigt met een isolement van de stad als het Arsenaal niet snel heropent en amper vijf dagen na zijn eerste dreigement, voegt hij de daad bij het woord. Twaalf dagen lang werd Mechelen van de buitenwereld afgesloten.

Op 14 juni heropende het Arsenaal en werd er een einde gesteld aan de isolatie. De zaak liep af met een sisser.

Het Mechelse stadsbestuur hield het been stijf, maar kon niet verhinderen dat de activiteiten in het Mechelse Arsenaal toch werden hervat.

Die werkkrachten kwamen voornamelijk van buiten Mechelen, uit de brede regio. Maar ook heel wat Mechelaars kozen eieren voor hun geld en gingen werken. Er was voor velen nu eenmaal de economische noodzaak, er was amper werk…

Het Arsenaal heeft gedurende de rest van de oorlog vrijwel op volle kracht gedraaid. De Duitsers gebruikten de faciliteiten van de Centrale Werkplaats inderdaad voor oorlogsdoeleinden.

Tijdens de isolatie van Mechelen werd er overal in de geallieerde wereld bericht dat er in Mechelen een opstand was uitgebroken waarbij zevenhonderd burgers werden gedood.

De stad zou bovendien zijn omringd met een elektrische draadversperring, zodat niemand er in of uit kon. Dat bleek een fabel die enkele weken later in alle kranten werd rechtgezet.

Wie weet dat er tijdens de Eerste Wereldoorlog in Groot-Brittannië meer dan 12.000 Mechelaars verbleven wiens enige contact met het thuisfront de berichtgeving in de krant was, kan zich inbeelden wat deze kwakkel daar teweeg heeft gebracht.

Het hele verhaal van de isolatie van Mechelen is een illustratie van de moeilijke relatie tussen de lokale en bezettende overheid in België.

Bij afwezigheid van de Belgische regering moesten de lokale overheden zelf uitzoeken hoe ze de eigen bevolking het best konden dienen, en in hoeverre ze daarvoor moest gehoorzamen aan de bezetter.

En wanneer het opportuun was zich met hand en tand te verzetten tegen een bevel.

Burgemeester Charles Dessain zou een jaar later, na een nieuw conflict met de bezetter, worden gearresteerd en tot het einde van de oorlog in een Duits kamp verblijven.

Dessain was de zoon van een Luikse drukker die pas halverwege de negentiende eeuw nar Mechelen was verhuisd. Hij werd in 1909 tegen de verwachtingen in burgemeester van de stad.

De overwegend Vlaamse bevolking kon dat maar matig smaken, zeker toen hij zich in 1912 onthield op de stemming voor een trapsgewijze vernederlandsing van de Gentse universiteit.

Maar de oorlog veranderde alles. Dessain werd in 1918 ingehaald als een lokale held. Een patriot die het opnam voor zijn stad en haar burgers. Mechelaar, at last.

Door Geert Clerbout, VRT-programmamedewerker, Mechelaar en auteur van "Oorlog aan de Dijle"

http://deredactie.be/cm/vrtnieuws/14-18/1.2357813#
_________________

"Omdat ik alles beter weet is het mijn plicht om betweters te minachten."
Marcel Wauters, Vlaams schrijver en kunstenaar 1921-2005
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
Percy Toplis



Geregistreerd op: 9-5-2009
Berichten: 15143
Woonplaats: Suindrecht

BerichtGeplaatst: 14 Jun 2018 9:06    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

De Blauwe Duivels in de Vogezen - Chasseurs Alpins

(...) Op 14 juni 1915 is de 6e compagnie van het 7e Bataillon Chasseurs Alpins verwikkeld in zware gevechten op de Hilsenfirst. De Alpenjagers zijn vrijwel omsingeld door “Gebirgsschütze” uit Württemberg. De situatie is buitengewoon zorgelijk: er zijn veel gewonden. Op de tweede en derde dag van de omsingeling is de situatie zondermeer wanhopig geworden.

Er is een zodanig ernstig gebrek aan voedsel en munitie ontstaan, dat de Chasseurs zich onder andere heldhaftig moeten verdedigen met het naar beneden gooien van rotsblokken. Hierbij gebruiken zij voor het eerst hun strijdkreet: “Sidi-Brahim!”, refererend aan de omsingeling van hun voorlopers, het 8e Bataillon Chasseurs à Pied in Algerije.

Na vier dagen omsingeling, op de 17e, wordt de 6e Compagnie dan eindelijk ontzet door vrijwilligers van compagnies van het 7e en het 13e B.C.A. Het is bij deze gelegenheid dat de Duitsers de Chasseurs “die Blaue Teufel” noemen. Alle bataljons Alpenjagers nemen meteen vol trots deze geuzennaam over, “les Diables Bleus”. (...)

http://pierreswesternfront.punt.nl/content/2016/03/De-Blauwe-Duivels-in-de-Vogezen--Chasseurs-Alpins
_________________

"Omdat ik alles beter weet is het mijn plicht om betweters te minachten."
Marcel Wauters, Vlaams schrijver en kunstenaar 1921-2005
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
Percy Toplis



Geregistreerd op: 9-5-2009
Berichten: 15143
Woonplaats: Suindrecht

BerichtGeplaatst: 14 Jun 2018 9:10    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

1914 – de aanloop tot Sarajewo

Op 14 juni 1914 brengt Ilic de wapens naar Sarajewo.

https://martinusevers.org/dossiers/dossiers1914/1914-de-aanloop-tot-sarajewo/

Danilo Ilić (Serbian Cyrillic: Данило Илић; 1891 – 3 February 1915) was a Bosnian Serb, born in what is modern-day Bosnia and Herzegovina. He attended the State Teachers' College in Sarajevo and for a while taught at a school in Bosnia. In 1913, Ilić moved to Belgrade where he became a journalist and a member of the Black Hand secret society. Ilić returned to Sarajevo in 1914 where he worked as an editor of a local Serb newspaper. He became a member of Mlada Bosna (Young Bosnia). He recruited Gavrilo Princip, Nedeljko Čabrinović, Vaso Čubrilović, Trifko Grabež, Muhamed Mehmedbašić, and Cvjetko Popović to assassinate Archduke Franz Ferdinand of Austria. He and Gavrilo Princip were close friends.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Danilo_Ili%C4%87
_________________

"Omdat ik alles beter weet is het mijn plicht om betweters te minachten."
Marcel Wauters, Vlaams schrijver en kunstenaar 1921-2005
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
Percy Toplis



Geregistreerd op: 9-5-2009
Berichten: 15143
Woonplaats: Suindrecht

BerichtGeplaatst: 14 Jun 2018 9:12    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Charles Hazeltine Hammann

Charles Hazeltine Hammann (Baltimore (Maryland), 16 maart 1892 - Langley Field (Virginia), 14 juni 1919) was een Amerikaanse marineofficier die een Medal of Honor ontving voor zijn heldendaden tijdens de Eerste Wereldoorlog.

Hammann was een vaandrig in de Naval Reserve Flying Corps gedurende de Eerste Wereldoorlog. Op 21 augustus 1918, terwijl hij vloog met een Navy watervliegtuig nabij Pula, Kroatië, landde hij in de Adriatische Zee, om vaandrig George H. Ludlow te redden, wiens vliegtuig was neergeschoten door de Oostenrijks-Hongaarse strijdkrachten. Ofschoon Hammanns watervliegtuig niet geschikt was voor twee personen, trotseerde hij de riskante vijandelijke aanvallen en volbracht hij de reddingsoperatie geheel succesvol. Ze keerden gezamenlijk veilig terug naar de basis te Porto Corsini, Italië. Charles Hammann werd gehuldigd met het Medal of Honor voor deze heldendaad. Vaandrig Charles H. Hammann verloor het leven terwijl hij zijn actieve plichten vervulde bij Langley Field, Virginia op 14 juni 1919.

https://nl.wikipedia.org/wiki/Charles_Hammann
_________________

"Omdat ik alles beter weet is het mijn plicht om betweters te minachten."
Marcel Wauters, Vlaams schrijver en kunstenaar 1921-2005
Naar boven
Bekijk gebruikers profiel Stuur privé bericht
Berichten van afgelopen:   
Plaats nieuw bericht   Plaats Reactie    Forum Eerste Wereldoorlog Forum Index -> Wat gebeurde er vandaag... Tijden zijn in GMT + 1 uur
Pagina 1 van 1

 
Ga naar:  
Je mag geen nieuwe onderwerpen plaatsen
Je mag geen reacties plaatsen
Je mag je berichten niet bewerken
Je mag je berichten niet verwijderen
Ja mag niet stemmen in polls


Powered by phpBB © 2001, 2002 phpBB Group