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BerichtGeplaatst: 11 Mrt 2006 7:59    Onderwerp: 11 Maart Reageer met quote

March 11

1918 First cases reported in deadly influenza epidemic

Just before breakfast on the morning of March 11, Private Albert Gitchell of the U.S. Army reports to the hospital at Fort Riley, Kansas, complaining of the cold-like symptoms of sore throat, fever and headache. By noon, over 100 of his fellow soldiers had reported similar symptoms, marking what are believed to be the first cases in the historic influenza epidemic of 1918. The flu would eventually kill 675,000 Americans and more than 20 million people (some believe the total may be closer to 40 million) around the world, proving to be a far deadlier force than even the First World War.

The initial outbreak of the disease, reported at Fort Riley in March, was followed by similar outbreaks in army camps and prisons in various regions of the country. The disease soon traveled to Europe with the American soldiers heading to aid the Allies on the battlefields of France. (In March 1918 alone, 84,000 American soldiers headed across the Atlantic; another 118,000 followed them the next month.) Once it arrived on a second continent, the flu showed no signs of abating: 31,000 cases were reported in June in Great Britain. The disease was soon dubbed the “Spanish flu” due to the shockingly high number of deaths in Spain (some 8 million, it was reported) after the initial outbreak there in May 1918.

The flu showed no mercy for combatants on either side of the trenches. Over the summer, the first wave of the epidemic hit German forces on the Western Front, where they were waging a final, no-holds-barred offensive that would determine the outcome of the war. It had a significant effect on the already weakening morale of the troops--as German army commander Crown Prince Rupprecht wrote on August 3: “poor provisions, heavy losses, and the deepening influenza have deeply depressed the spirits of men in the III Infantry Division.” Meanwhile, the flu was spreading fast beyond the borders of Western Europe, due to its exceptionally high rate of virulence and the massive transport of men on land and aboard ship due to the war effort. By the end of the summer, numerous cases had been reported in Russia, North Africa and India; China, Japan, the Philippines and even New Zealand would eventually fall victim as well.

The Great War ended on November 11, but influenza continued to wreak international havoc, flaring again in the U.S. in an even more vicious wave with the return of soldiers from the war and eventually killing an estimated 28 percent of the country’s population before it finally petered out. In its December 28, 1918, issue, the American Medical Association acknowledged the end of one momentous conflict and urged the acceptance of a new challenge, stating that “Medical science for four and one-half years devoted itself to putting men on the firing line and keeping them there. Now it must turn with its whole might to combating the greatest enemy of all—infectious disease.”

www.historychannel.com
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BerichtGeplaatst: 11 Mrt 2006 19:07    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Quote:
Events
1 1917 Bagdad captured by the British. Turks beaten on both banks of the Tigris. 290 prisoners taken on the Ancre.

Births
1 1892 Robert DoddsCanada
2 1894 Emil ThuyGermany
3 1895 Johann SchlimpenGermany

Deaths
1 1918 Attilio ImolesiItaly
2 1918 John RobertsonScotland
3 1948 John QuestedEngland

Claims
1 1917 James SmithCanada #2 #3
2 1917 Charles PickthorneEngland #4
3 1917 Arthur RandallEngland #2
4 1917 Herbert TraversEngland #1
5 1917 Hartmut BaldamusGermany #13
6 1917 Walter von Bülow-BothkampGermany #9
7 1917 Wilhelm CymeraGermany #3
8 1917 Heinrich GontermannGermany #3
9 1917 Friedrich HengstGermany #1
10 1917 Fritz KosmahlGermany #5
11 1917 Edmund NathanaelGermany #2
12 1917 Alfred NiederhoffGermany #1
13 1917 Hermann PfeifferGermany #9
14 1917 Manfred von RichthofenGermany #26
15 1917 Karl SchäferGermany #7
16 1917 Kurt SchönfelderGermany u/c
17 1917 Adolf SchulteGermany #4
18 1917 Paul SträhleGermany #2
19 1917 Werner VossGermany #14 #15
20 1918 Geoffrey HughesAustralia #4
21 1918 Benno Fiala von FernbruggAustro-Hungarian Empire #11
22 1918 Frank Linke-CrawfordAustro-Hungarian Empire #20
23 1918 Frederick ArmstrongCanada #9
24 1918 Frederic BrownCanada #5
25 1918 William HarrisonCanada #7
26 1918 George JohnsonCanada #3
27 1918 Alfred KochCanada #6 #7
28 1918 Francis QuigleyCanada #24 #25 #26 #27
29 1918 Stanley RosevearCanada #14
30 1918 Alexander ShookCanada #9
31 1918 Hazel WallaceCanada #3
32 1918 Gordon AppsEngland #1
33 1918 Harold BalfourEngland #8
34 1918 Alfred BrownEngland #4 #5
35 1918 Walter CarlawEngland #1
36 1918 Peter CarpenterEngland #10
37 1918 Percy ClaysonEngland #3
38 1918 Arthur CooperEngland #7
39 1918 Ernest EltonEngland #6 #7
40 1918 Herbert HamiltonEngland #5
41 1918 George HaywardEngland #5 #6
42 1918 W.N. HolmesEngland #1
43 1918 Alan JerrardEngland #3
44 1918 Ronald MarkEngland #6
45 1918 Herbert RichardsonEngland #5 #6
46 1918 Harry RobinsonEngland #2
47 1918 Kenneth Seth-SmithEngland #6
48 1918 Thomas SharpeEngland #1
49 1918 James SlaterEngland #5 #6
50 1918 John TrollopeEngland #5
51 1918 Stanley WallageEngland #2 #3
52 1918 Henry WoollettEngland #7
53 1918 Fernand ChavannesFrance #4
54 1918 Lionel de MarmierFrance #4
55 1918 Hector GaraudFrance #11
56 1918 Gabriel GuerinFrance #16
57 1918 Friedrich EhmannGermany #1
58 1918 Bertram HeinrichGermany #10
59 1918 Lothar von RichthofenGermany #27
60 1918 Edgar ScholtzGermany #2
61 1918 Herbert DrewittNew Zealand #4
62 1918 George ThomsonScotland #9
63 1918 Robert OwenWales #3

Losses
1 1917 Arthur RandallEnglandwounded in action
2 1917 James RobbScotlandwounded in action
3 1918 Attilio ImolesiItalydied from wounds
4 1918 Andrew Beauchamp-ProctorSouth Africacrashed
5 1918 John RobertsonScotlandwounded in action; died from wounds




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BerichtGeplaatst: 10 Mrt 2010 19:44    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

THE "ROKEBY VENUS" DAMAGED
OUTRAGE AT THE NATIONAL GALLERY
MILITANT SUFFRAGISTS WANTON ACT


THE MORNING POST MARCH 11 1914

In pursuance of the campaign of violence entered upon by the militant Suffragists, by which they claim to further the cause of "Votes for Women," what has been described as a "deplorable act of vandalism" was perpetrated at the National Gallery yesterday morning, when a wanton attack was made on the picture known as the "Rokeby Venus" or the "Venus with the Mirror," officially ascribed to Velasquez, which hung in Room 17 at the Gallery. The outrage was committed at a time when there were only a few visitors in the Gallery. Miss Mary Richardson, a militant whose name has been previously associated with the "advanced Policy" of the Suffragists, suddenly produced a chopper, and before anything could be done to prevent her she attacked the picture, smashing the glass and slashing the canvas. She was immediately arrested, and at Bow-street Police Court was committed for trial without bail.

Leuk artikel over de suffragettes... http://freepages.genealogy.rootsweb.ancestry.com/~thelamp/sufferage/THE%20MORNING%20POST%20MARCH%2011%201914.htm

NATIONAL GALLERY OUTRAGE

THE TIMES , WEDNESDAY, MARCH 11, 1914.

The famous Rokeby Valasquez, commonly known as the "Venus with the Mirror," which was presented to the National Gallery in 1906, was mutilated yesterday morning by the prominent militant woman suffragist Mary Richardson. She attacked the picture with a small chopper with a long narrow blade, similar to the instruments used by butchers, and in a few seconds inflicted upon it severe if not irreparable damage. In consequence of the outrage the National Gallery will remain closed to the public until further notice.

Mooi... http://www.heretical.com/suffrage/1914tms2.html
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BerichtGeplaatst: 10 Mrt 2010 19:55    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

100 Events in the Gallipoli Campaign

11 March 1915
General Sir Ian Hamilton, aged 62, was appointed to command a proposed Constantinople Expeditionary Force (later changed to Mediterranean Expeditionary Force) comprising the British 29th Division, the ANZAC Corps, the Royal Marine Division and a French Corps.

http://www.anzacsite.gov.au/5environment/timelines/100-events-gallipoli-campaign/march-1915.html

Ian Standish Monteith Hamilton

General Sir Ian Standish Monteith Hamilton GCB GCMG DSO TD (16 January 1853 — 12 October 1947) was a general in the British Army and is most notably known for commanding the ill-fated Mediterranean Expeditionary Force during the Battle of Gallipoli.

Kitchener appointed Hamilton to command the Allied Mediterranean Expeditionary Force to gain control of the Dardanelles straits from Turkey and capture Constantinople in March 1915.[7] Hamilton was 62 and had been in charge of Land defenses for England. Whilst a senior and respected officer, perhaps more experienced in different campaigns than most, he was considered too unconventional, too intellectual and too friendly with politicians to be given a command on the western front.[8] Hamilton was not given a chance to take part in planning the campaign. Intelligence reports were poor and grossly underestimated the strength of defending forces and their willingness to fight. It was conceived that a force of 70,000 men would be adequate to rapidly overpower the defenders.

Lees verder! http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ian_Standish_Monteith_Hamilton
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BerichtGeplaatst: 10 Mrt 2010 20:03    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

World War 1: A Short Timeline 1915

March 11: The Reprisals Order, in which Britain banned all 'neutral' parties from trading with Germany.

http://europeanhistory.about.com/od/worldwar1/a/ww1stimeline4.htm
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BerichtGeplaatst: 10 Mrt 2010 20:19    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Fall of Baghdad (1917)

On 11 March 1917, the British Indian Army fighting the Ottoman Turks in the First World War, after a series of defeats, captured Baghdad in a two-year campaign.

The march on Baghdad resumed on 5 March 1917. Three days later, Maude's corps reached the Diyala River on the outskirts of the city.

Khalil Pasha chose to defend Baghdad at the confluence of the Diyala and the Tigris, some 35 miles south of Baghdad. The Ottoman troops resisted the initial British assault on 9 March. General Maude then shifted the majority of his army north. He believed that he could outflank the Ottoman positions and strike directly for Baghdad. Khalil Pasha responded by shifting his army out of its defensive positions to mirror the move of the British on the other side of the river. A single regiment was left to hold the original Diyala River defences and the British crushed this regiment with a sudden assault on 10 March 1917.

This sudden defeat unnerved Khalil Pasha and he ordered his army to retreat north to Baghdad. The Ottoman authorities then ordered the evacuation of Baghdad at 8 p.m. on 10 March. But the situation was rapidly moving beyond Khalil Pasha's control, the British followed close on the heels of the Ottoman troops and they captured Baghdad without a fight on 11 March 1917. Some 9,000 Ottoman troops were caught in the confusion and became prisoners of the British.

The British troops were greeted with enthusiasm from the local population. A week after the capture, General Maude issued the Proclamation of Baghdad which included the line: "Our armies do not come into your cities and lands as conquerors or enemies, but as liberators"

Lees alles op http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fall_of_Baghdad_(1917)
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BerichtGeplaatst: 10 Mrt 2010 20:23    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

THE RUSSIAN REVOLUTION OF 1917

Two Parallel Developments

On March 12, the Duma, rejecting the Czar's order to dissolve, chose a Provisional Government to rule Russia. On March 11, the hungry strikers and the Petrograd troops had set up the Petrograd Soviet of Workers' and Soldiers' Deputies. Workers and soldiers in other places followed their example and also set up soviets to take over functions of local governments. These soviets were popularly elected by the masses and so enjoyed more popular support than the Provisional Government which represented mainly the middle classes.

The Provisional Government, formed under the premiership of Prince Lvov, was recognized as the legal authority by both the foreign governments and the soviets in Russia. The foreign governments recognized the Provisional Government because it advocated those democratic principles close to British and American democracy. The soviets accepted the legality of the Provisional Government on condition that it did not go against the aims of the soviets. A curious situation arose: the Provisional Government ruled the country with full support only of the middle classes, the soviets got the majority support from the people but did not want to rule the country. Thus, the rule of the Provisional Government had to depend upon the conditional support of the soviets.

http://www.thecorner.org/hist/russia/revo1917.htm

Revolution against the Tsar

At his headquarters at the front, Nicholas received news of demonstrations in the capital and believed it was of little consequence, and he sent an order forbidding any more demonstrations or assemblies. Early Sunday morning, March 11, huge posters were plastered around Petrograd announcing that all demonstrations and assemblies would be dispersed and all those who were not back at their jobs Monday would be conscripted into the military and sent to the front. And, Sunday morning, a number of military regiments in combat gear appeared in the city.

That Sunday, crowds filled the streets as they had the day before, and they tore down the government warnings. In the afternoon, a military unit – the Pavlovski Guard – fired into a group of demonstrators, killing forty or fifty and wounding others. Some soldiers who had been ordered to fire, fired into the air. Elsewhere more marchers were shot, but marchers continued to feel the power of their numbers. Where they were fired upon by police they chased the police away. The police in Petrograd numbered only about 3,500 – too few for any hope of controlling the people in the streets.

Lees verder op http://www.fsmitha.com/h2/ch07.htm
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BerichtGeplaatst: 10 Mrt 2010 20:43    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Influenza 1918

Early in the morning of March 11, 1918, a young private reported to the Army hospital at Fort Riley, Kansas, complaining of fever, sore throat, and headache. Then, another sick soldier appeared, then another and another. By noon, the hospital had more than one hundred cases; in a week, there were five hundred. Forty-eight soldiers died at Fort Riley that spring. No one knew why.

America in 1918 was a nation at war. Draft call-ups, bond drives, troop shipments were all in high gear when the flu epidemic appeared. American soldiers from Fort Riley carried the disease to the trenches of Europe, where it mutated into a killer virus. The disease would later be dubbed, inaccurately, Spanish influenza. Spain had suffered from a devastating outbreak of influenza in May and June of 1918. The country, being a non-combatant in the war, did not censor news of the epidemic that was cutting through its population and was therefore incorrectly identified as its place of origin.

Meanwhile, returning American troops were bringing the flu back home. First hundreds, then thousands of soldiers were lining up outside infirmaries and hospitals at army bases across the country, falling ill with a swiftness that defied belief. Dr. Victor Vaughan, Surgeon General of the Army, was stunned by what he saw at Camp Devens just outside of Boston. “Every bed is full, yet others crowd in,” he wrote. “The faces wear a bluish cast; a cough brings up the blood-stained sputum. In the morning, the dead bodies are stacked about the morgue like cordwood.” On the day Vaughan arrived, 63 men died at Camp Devens.

In September, the disease spread to the civilian population. It moved swiftly down the eastern seaboard to New York, Philadelphia, and beyond. Anna Milani remembers sitting on her front step one day: “Diagonally across from us a fifteen-year-old girl was just buried. Toward evening, we heard a lot of screaming going on. In that same house, a little eighteen-month-old baby passed away.” That month, 12,000 Americans died of influenza.

It was a flu unlike any other. People could be healthy in the morning and dead by nightfall. Others died more slowly, suffocating from the buildup of liquid in their lungs.

Thanks to advances in microbiology, researchers had developed vaccines for many bacterial diseases: smallpox, anthrax, rabies, diphtheria, meningitis. But doctors were helpless to stop the influenza of 1918. Though they knew the disease spread through the air, medical researchers were unable to see the tiny virus through microscopes of the time and incorrectly identified its cause as a bacteria. Vaccines they developed didn’t work; the virus was too small, too elusive.

With medical science powerless, many people turned to folk remedies: garlic, camphor balls, kerosene on sugar, boneset tea. Public health officials distributed masks, closed schools; laws forbade spitting on the streets. Nothing worked. The war was at cross-purposes with the epidemic: the war effort brought people into the streets for rallies and bond drives. They coughed on each other, infected each other. Soldiers traveled in crowded transport ships. The disease spread everywhere.

October saw the epidemic’s full horror: more than 195,000 people died in America alone. There was a nationwide shortage of caskets. In Philadelphia, the dead were left in gutters and stacked in caskets on front porches. Trucks drove the city streets, picking up the caskets and corpses. People hid indoors, afraid to interact with their friends and neighbors.

“Everybody was living in deadly fear because it was so quick, so sudden, and so terrifying,” says William Sardo, the son of a funeral director whose home was stacked with caskets of flu victims. “It destroyed the intimacy that existed among people.”

Surgeon General Vaughan reached a frightening conclusion. “If the epidemic continues its mathematical rate of acceleration,” he announced, “civilization could easily disappear from the face of the earth within a few weeks.”

Then, just as suddenly as it struck, the calamitous disease abruptly began to vanish. By mid-November, the numbers of dead were plunging. “In light of our knowledge of influenza,” says Dr. Shirley Fannin, a Los Angeles County public health official, “we do understand that it probably ran out of fuel. It ran out of people who were susceptible and could be infected.”

Over time, World War I and painful memories associated with the epidemic allowed many people to forget about it. But for the survivors, the influenza of 1918 changed their lives forever.

http://www.pbs.org/wgbh/americanexperience/influenza/introduction
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BerichtGeplaatst: 10 Mrt 2010 20:48    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

British War Cabinet - March 11, 1918 (CAB 23/5, War Cabinet 363).

Stores at Archangel & Murmansk; Japanese Intervention in Siberia; Formation of Eastern Committee.

http://www.gwpda.org/1918/cab-23-5-wc-363-55_StoresArch_Murm.pdf
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BerichtGeplaatst: 10 Mrt 2010 20:55    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

11 March 1918

The first regular international air mail is organized in Austria by A.R. von Marwil. Mail is carried in a Hansa-Brandenburg CI from Vienna to Lvov (then Lemberg) and Proskurov via Cracow. A branch service is also run from Proskurov to Odessa. The service expands on 11 July 1918 by adding Budapest to its destinations, but later collapses with the defeat of the Austro-Hungarian Empire in 1918.

http://www.warbirds-online.org/2010/03/07/this-week-in-militaryaviation-history-8-14-march/
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BerichtGeplaatst: 10 Mrt 2010 20:57    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Jack Barton's War Diary, March 1918

Monday, 11th March, 1918
Same place. We do fatigues improving our defences, each day will bring us closer to active fighting which must come with the warmer weather.

http://barton101.com/wardiary/1918-03.htm
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BerichtGeplaatst: 10 Mrt 2010 21:15    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

The French Syndicalist Movement

Boris Souvarine

Source: The Call, 11 March, 1920

The French syndicalist (or trade unionist) organisation before the war was a genuine organisation of battle against the bosses, against the bourgeoisie, against the capitalist state. The enormous majority of syndicates, industrial federations, and bourses de travail (the literal meaning of this term is “labour exchanges” representing the communal organisation of all the syndicates in the same city or town) were impregnated with the revolutionary spirit and inspired to a large extent by the doctrines of anarchism. But the war has orientated the workers’ movement in a new direction.

The reformist/minority of the old days has become the majority. Several of the advance guard elernents have become forces of moderation. The old leaders who invoked the thought of Bakunin and advertised the formulas of Proudhon, who adopted the conceptions of Geoge Sorel or of Kropotkin, speak to day in the dialect of Gompers. How has this shift of policy been brought about?

It is impossible for the foreigner to grasp the causes for this evolution. One has to live in France, rub elbows with the militants, and frequent the syndicalist circles to understand the true motives.

THE PRE-WAR ANTI MILITARISTS
Before the war the principal terrain of combat of the revolutionary syndicalists was that of opposition to war and to the army. Anti-militarism and anti-patriotism were the favourite platforms of the workers of the advance guard. The leaders, Jouhaux, Dumoulin, Yvetot, Merrheim, Monatte, Rosmer, Griffuelhes and others were in accord in calling for a general strike in case of war and in resisting militarism by all possible means. They reproached the German syndicalists for not declaring themselves ready to employ the same tactics. And they had nothing but disdain for the English and American trade unionists, wham they reproached as being interested only in their own narrow and selfish corporate interests.

The truth is that the French revolutionary syndicalists were drunk with words and anarchistic formulas, and they did not take any account of realities. If they had been guided by the Marxist method, they would have understood that it is not sufficient to make promises, but that the action has to correspond to the possibilities, presented by the economic situation. And so they would not have promised, in the event of a war, to call a general strike which they were incapable of accomplishing, but they would have adopted an attitude of opposition which would have permitted at the end of a few months to determine an irresistible current against the war and the belligerent governments. It is in this manner that the Russian Social-Democrats and the Italian Socialists have acted.

TREACHERY!
What was to happen has happened. On the morrow of the declaration of war, the syndicalists found themselves incapable of resisting the wave of chauvinism, and consequently incapable of realising their programme, for the sabotage of mobilisation, for the general strike etc.

Lees http://www.marxists.org/history/etol/writers/souvar/works/1920/03/11.htm
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BerichtGeplaatst: 10 Mrt 2010 21:25    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Ironie...

11 March 1920, Written Answers (Commons)

GUN FIRING, SHOEBURYNESS
.

HC Deb 11 March 1920 vol 126 c1542W 1542W

Mr. ALFRED T. DAVIES asked the Secretary of State for War whether, in view of the heavy cost entailed by the constant gun practice at Shoeburyness, he will take measures to reduce this to a minimum forthwith?

§ Mr. CHURCHILL The only gun firing at present carried out at Shoeburyness is in connection with experimental work for the Ordnance Committee and "Proof" of ammunition. The firing is carried out by the Superintendent of Experiments, and includes much and varied research work now in progress which is of vital importance to both the Navy and the Army.

http://hansard.millbanksystems.com/written_answers/1920/mar/11/gun-firing-shoeburyness
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BerichtGeplaatst: 11 Mrt 2015 10:23    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Order in Council vom 11. März 1915

Whereas the German Government has issued certain Orders which, in violation of the usages of war, purport to declare the waters surrounding the United Kingdom a military area, in which all British and allied merchant vessels will be destroyed irrespective of the safety of the lives of passengers and crew, and in which neutral shipping will be exposed to similar danger in view of the uncertainties of naval warfare;

And whereas in a memorandum accompanying the said Orders neutrals are warned against entrusting crews, passengers, or goods to British or allied ships;

And whereas such attempts on the part of the enemy give to His Majesty an unquestionable right of retaliation;

And whereas His Majesty has therefore decided to adopt further measures in order to prevent commodities of any kind from reaching or leaving Germany, though such measures will be enforced without risk to neutral ships or to neutral or noncombatant life, and in strict observance of the dictates of humanity;

And whereas the Allies of His Majesty are associated with Him in the steps now to be announced for restricting further the commerce of Germany:

His Majesty is therefore pleased, by and with the advice of His Privy Council, to order and it is hereby ordered as follows: –

I. No merchant vessel which sailed from her port of departure after the 1st March, 1915, shall be allowed to proceed on her voyage to any German port.

Unless the vessel receives a pass enabling her to proceed to some neutral or allied port to be named in the pass, goods on board any such vessel must be discharged in a British port and placed in the custody of the Marshal of the Prize Court. Goods so discharged, not being contraband of war, shall, if not requisitioned for the use of His Majesty, be restored by Order of the Court, upon such terms as the Court may in the circumstances deem to be just, to the person entitled thereto.

II. No merchant vessel which sailed from any German port after the 1st March, 1915, shall be allowed to proceed on her voyage with any goods on board laden at such port.

All goods laden at such port must be discharged in a British or allied port. Goods so discharged in a British port shall be placed in the custody of the Marshal of the Prize Court, and, if not requisitioned for the use of His Majesty, shall be detained or sold under the direction of the Prize Court. The proceeds of goods so sold shall be paid into Court and dealt with in such manner as the Court may in the circumstances deem to be just.

Provided that no proceeds of the sale of such goods shall be paid out of Court until the conclusion of peace, except on the application of the proper Officer of the Crown, unless it be shown that the goods had become neutral properly before the issue of this Order.

Provided also that nothing here in shall prevent the release of neutral property laden at such enemy port on the application of the proper Officer of the Crown.

III. Every merchant vessel which sailed from her port of departure after the 1st March, 1915, on her way to a port other than a German port, carrying goods with an enemy destination, or which are enemy property, may be required to discharge such goods in a British or allied port. Any goods so discharged in a British port shall be placed in the custody of the Marshal of the Prize Court, and, unless they are contraband of war, shall, if not requisitioned for the use of His Majesty, be restored by Order of the Court, upon such terms as the Court may in the circumstances deem to be just, to the person entitled thereto.

Provided that this Article shall not apply in any case falling within Articles II or IV of this Order.

IV. Every merchant vessel which sailed from a port other than a German port after the 1st March, 1915, having on board goods which are of enemy origin or are enemy property may be required to discharge such goods in a British or allied port. Goods so discharged in a British port shall be placed in the custody of the Marshal of the Prize Court, and, if not requisitioned for the use of His Majesty, shall be detained or sold under the direction of the Prize Court. The proceeds of goods so sold shall be paid into Court and dealt with in such manner as the Court may in the circumstances deem to be just.

Provided that no proceeds of the sale of such goods shall be paid out of Court until the conclusion of peace except on the application of the proper Officer of the Crown, unless it be shown that the goods had become neutral property before the issue of this Order.

Provided also that nothing herein shall prevent the release of neutral property of enemy origin on the application of the proper Officer of the Crown.

V. - (1) Any person claiming to be interested in, or to have any claim in respect of any goods (not being contraband of war) placed in the custody of the Marshal of the Prize Court under this Order, or in the proceeds of such goods, may forthwith issue a writ in the Prize Court against the proper Officer of the Crown and apply for an order that the goods should be restored to him, or that their proceeds should be paid to him, or for such other order as the circumstances of the case may require.

(2) The practice and procedure of the Prize Court shall, so far as applicable, be followed mutatis mutandis in any proceedings consequential upon this Order.

VI. A merchant vessel which has cleared for a neutral port from a British or allied port, or which has been allowed to pass having an ostensible destination to a neutral port, and proceeds to an enemy port, shall, if captured on any subsequent voyage, be liable to condemnation.

VII. Nothing in this Order shall be deemed to affect the liability of any vessel or goods to capture or condemnation independently of this Order.

VIII. Nothing in this Order shall prevent the relaxation of the provisions of this Order in respect of the merchant vessels of any country which declares that no commerce intended for or originating in Germany or belonging to German subjects shall enjoy the protection of its flag.


http://www.wintersonnenwende.com/scriptorium/deutsch/archiv/hungerblockade/ehw19.html
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