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Bavaria, Germany, WWI Personnel Rosters, 1914-1918

 
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Yvonne
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BerichtGeplaatst: 20 Jan 2010 10:25    Onderwerp: Bavaria, Germany, WWI Personnel Rosters, 1914-1918 Reageer met quote

Bavaria, Germany, WWI Personnel Rosters, 1914-1918
Kriegsranglisten und -stammrollen des Königreichs Bayern, 1. Weltkrieg

http://search.ancestry.com/search/db.aspx?dbid=1631&enc=1

En daarop volgend een interessante speurtocht:

Who was a German soldier who bore my great-grandfather’s name?
In 1998, I visited my Bavarian great-grandparents’ town for the first time. I was not well-prepared to do any genealogical research because the trip came about as a convenient accident, not through careful planning. While I was in the general area for work-related travel, I knew I had to make a detour to their town, Pfaffenhofen an der Ilm. Back then, I hadn’t traced either family too far back, but through my great-grandparents’ marriage record I knew that he, Josef Bergmeister, was from the nearby town of Puch, and she, Maria Echerer, was from Pfaffenhofen.

Some friends from a different region of Germany met me there – they thought it would be an amusing weekend trip to visit a “foreign” area of their own country and see their American friend. One joked about this tiny town they drove through called Puch. “Wait,” I said, “that’s my great-grandfather’s town! Can you show it to me?” They said yes, but assured me that it was so tiny, there wasn’t much to see.

The next day, we drove a 2-car convoy to Puch from Pfaffenhofen (approximately 8 miles). They drove the lead car and came to a stop in what was presumably the center of town. My friend got out of the car and came up to my window asking, “Is there anything to actually see here?”

I was busy squinting over his shoulder. “Yes,” I replied, pointing beyond where he stood, “there’s that!”
Lees verder:
http://pastprologue.wordpress.com/2010/01/18/cousins-countries-and-war/

En een handige leidraad over hoe Ancestry.com te gebruiken:
http://pastprologue.wordpress.com/2010/01/19/bavarian-military-rosters/
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Yvonne
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Berichten: 45653

BerichtGeplaatst: 24 Jan 2010 22:29    Onderwerp: Reageer met quote

Volgend deel staat er:

What happened at the battle that cost Josef his life? How were his American cousins affected by the same war?
In Part 3 we read Josef Bergmeister’s service record and discovered that he died as a result of injuries sustained during the battle of Fleury-Thiaumont in July, 1916. Today’s post will discuss this battle in more detail.

The town names of Fleury and Thiaumont may not be familiar, but surely everyone has heard of the Battle of Verdun, the bloodiest and perhaps the longest battle in history. The Battle of Verdun was a series of battles from 21 February – 19 December 1916 between the German and French armies on the Western Front. The numbers alone paint a picture of what happened there. In the end, an estimated 250,000 men were killed, and another 500,000 were wounded. Approximately 40 million artillery shells were used by both sides during the fight. The battlefield itself was not very large – just a long and narrow piece of land.

During the Battle of Verdun, the town of Fleury changed hands between the German and the French sixteen times. The town was completely destroyed and is uninhabited today. To the German army, the small town was the gateway to Verdun, which in turn would lead directly to Paris. During the month of June, 1916, the Germans fought hard to move into the town. By the end of June, it was reported that it was unbearably hot.

http://pastprologue.wordpress.com/2010/01/21/the-great-war-and-the-homefront/
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